years

The coronavirus pandemic ‘has undone years of work’ for women, Yahoo Finance survey shows

Women, especially middle-aged ones, have been hit the hardest by the coronavirus pandemic in terms of job loss, fewer options for remote work, and needing more time to recover financially from the crisis, according to a new survey from Harris Poll and Yahoo Finance. 

Nearly all men between the ages of 35 and 44 — 96% — were still working the same job as before the pandemic, only 60% of women the same age were, according to the survey of 2033 Americans. The latest unemployment rate shows 8.9% unemployment for men in that age group and 9.4% for women in June.

Read more: Here’s how to navigate changes in your career

A similar discrepancy shows up between men and women who are 45 to 54. More than three-quarters of men that age have the same job, but just under 6 in 10 women do, the survey found.

That difference, among

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Couple Married for 53 Years Hold Hands as They Die of Coronavirus on the Same Day

A couple who were married for more than half a century reportedly succumbed to coronavirus complications on the same day in Texas.

According to CNN, Betty and Curtis Tarpley, 80 and 79, died within an hour of each other on June 18 and held hands during their final minutes together.

The couple’s son, Tim Tarpley, told the network that Betty showed symptoms of the deadly disease just before she was taken to Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Fort Worth on June 9. Curtis was admitted to the same hospital just two days later.

Tarpley said Betty phoned both him and his sister, telling them she was at peace with dying as her condition continued to decline.

“I just screamed, ‘No!’ I was like, ‘I’ve got too much, too many other things to do in this life that I want to show you, and I’m not ready,'” he recalled to CNN.

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With bankruptcies surging, 2020 may become one of the busiest years for Chapter 11 filings since the Great Recession

Twelve midsize to large corporations – all with more than $10 million in debt – filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection during the third week of June, another consequence of the coronavirus pandemic and continued trouble in America’s oil industry.

The filings represent the highest weekly total of the year, and experts believe this is just the beginning of a bankruptcy tsunami that will wash over the country’s largest companies this summer and then drench both smaller businesses and individuals if government stimulus money dries up.

“I very much expect to see the numbers continue to rise” said Ed Flynn, a consultant for the American Bankruptcy Institute, a nonpartisan research organization. “Every day there are more rumors of this or that company, and the rumors are almost never wrong.”

The types of companies affected are unsurprising. Since the start of the pandemic, they have included businesses that consumers have studiously

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Broadway closed until 2021; high price set for promising drug; Fauci optimistic of vaccine by year’s end

Broadway stages will remain dark through 2020 amid a national boom in coronavirus cases, but the nation’s leading infectious diseases expert remains “cautiously optimistic” that a vaccine could be widely available by year’s end.

And a drug company’s steep price for remdesivir, a drug that has proved to shorten recovery times for severe COVID-19 patients by about 31%, is drawing criticism.

Nashville, Tennessee, is requiring masks as of Monday. San Francisco Mayor London Breed halted its plans for businesses that were scheduled to reopen Monday. In Arizona, the mayor of one town said he has no plans to cancel a slew of upcoming summer events or require masks despite a boom in cases in his state.

“It is somewhat alarming how many expect and almost invite a more drastic infringement on their freedoms,” Eagar Mayor Bryce Hamblin said in a statement. “My response from the onset of COVID-19 pandemic has

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Broadway closed until 2021; high price set for promising drug; Fauci optimistic of vaccine by year’s end;

Broadway stages will remain dark through 2020 amid a national boom in coronavirus cases, but the nation’s leading infectious diseases expert remains “cautiously optimistic” that a vaccine could be widely available by year’s end.

And a drug company’s steep price for remdesivir, a drug that has proved to shorten recovery times for severe COVID-19 patients by about 31% is drawing criticism.

Nashville, Tennessee, is requiring masks as of Monday. San Francisco Mayor London Breed halted its plans for businesses that were scheduled to reopen Monday. In Arizona, the mayor of one town said he has no plans to cancel a slew of upcoming summer events or require masks despite a boom in cases in his state.

“It is somewhat alarming how many expect and almost invite a more drastic infringement on their freedoms,” Eagar Mayor Bryce Hamblin said in a statement. “My response from the onset of COVID-19 pandemic has

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Fauci optimistic of vaccine by year’s end; states slow reopenings; Gilead Sciences sets price for remdesivir

More states were slowing reopening plans Monday amid a national boom in coronavirus cases while the nation’s leading infectious diseases expert remained “cautiously optimistic” that a vaccine could be widely available by year’s end.

And a drug company’s steep price for remdesivir, a drug that has proved to shorten recovery times by about 31% for severe COVID-19 patients, is drawing criticism.

Nashville, Tennessee, is requiring masks as of Monday. California Gov. Gavin Newsom ordered bars in eight counties to close Sunday, days after governors in Florida and Texas issued similar, wide-ranging edicts. San Francisco Mayor London Breed halted its plans for businesses that were scheduled to reopen Monday. The state of Washington paused its fourth and final reopening phase. 

In Arizona, the number of confirmed cases increased by more than 3,850 on Sunday. Meanwhile, the mayor of a town in an eastern part of the state said that he has

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Fauci still hopeful of vaccine by year’s end; states slow reopenings; Gilead Sciences sets price for remdesivir

More states were slowing reopening plans Monday amid a national boom in coronavirus cases while the nation’s leading infectious diseases expert remained “cautiously optimistic” that a vaccine could be widely available by year’s end.

And a drug company’s steep price for remdesivir, a drug that has proven to shorten recovery times by about 31% for severe COVID-19 patients, is drawing criticism.

Nashville, Tennessee, will require masks starting Monday. California Gov. Gavin Newsom ordered bars in eight counties to close Sunday, days after governors in Florida and Texas issued similar, wide-ranging edicts. San Francisco Mayor London Breed halted its plans for businesses that were scheduled to reopen Monday. The state of Washington paused its fourth and final reopening phase. 

In Arizona, the number of confirmed cases increased by more than 3,850 on Sunday. Meanwhile, the mayor of a town in an eastern part of the state said that he has no

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Teenager jailed for 15 years for throwing boy from Tate viewing platform

Jonty Bravery was jailed for at least 15 years
Jonty Bravery was jailed for at least 15 years

A mentally ill teenager who threw a six-year-old boy from the viewing platform of the Tate Modern has been jailed for a minimum of 15 years as a judge warned he may never be released.

Jonty Bravery, 18, had been allowed to leave his supported accommodation unsupervised, despite a catalogue of warning signs that he was violent and intent on killing someone.

He shrugged and laughed after picking up the young French boy, who was on holiday with his parents, and hurling him off the London museum’s tenth floor balcony. He told the victim’s father: “Yes, I am mad” and was also heard to say: “It’s not my fault, it’s social services’ fault.” 

The boy  suffered devastating injuries, including a bleed on the brain and spinal damage, and now needs round-the-clock care. It is not known whether he will ever make

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After Years of Decline, the Military’s Commissary System Just Had Its Highest Sales Day Ever

Between an influx of veterans newly granted access to military resale stores and customers preparing for shutdowns during the novel coronavirus pandemic, Defense Department commissary stores saw a 26% increase in sales in the first quarter of 2020.

Now the DoD is trying to figure out how to retain these customers, looking at their shopping preferences and behaviors to guide future services and offerings at stores, DoD Chief Management Officer Lisa Hershman told Military.com.

Read Next: F-35A Joint Strike Fighters Banned from Flying Near Lightning over Explosion Concerns

While a boost in customers was not unexpected this year, given that 4.1 million disabled veterans became eligible to shop at military stores on Jan. 1, the jump in patrons just before and during the pandemic was unprecedented: On March 13 — the Friday before many states moved to stay-at-home orders — the commissary system saw its highest single sales day ever,

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I Don’t Look Sick But I’ve Had MS For 14 Years. Here’s How It’s Changed My Life.

The author. (Photo: Brad Fowler / Song of Myself Photography)
The author. (Photo: Brad Fowler / Song of Myself Photography)

My headaches appeared out of nowhere. For several weeks in 2006, I couldn’t do my job as a journalist without feeling a nagging pain directly behind my right eye. My co-worker was worried, but I wasn’t. We were reporters working long hours, and I attributed my ailment to eyestrain from staring at the computer every day.

“Just go to the doctor,” she said.

I was only 26 but decided to visit my eye doctor’s office in New York City just to be sure. When I mentioned the headaches, he asked me to cover my left eye so he could test my right one.

“Can you see what color this is?” he asked.

I squinted with my right eye. I couldn’t. My left eye had been compensating for my weak one, and I hadn’t even realized it.

“What’s wrong with me?”

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