Warns

Coronavirus spike jeopardizes opening of schools, L.A. County’s top health official warns

Cerritos Elementary School Principal Perla Chavez-Fritz, left, shows her Glendale campus to L.A. County schools Supt. Debra Duardo. School districts statewide face decisions on how and when to reopen their campuses. <span class="copyright">(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Cerritos Elementary School Principal Perla Chavez-Fritz, left, shows her Glendale campus to L.A. County schools Supt. Debra Duardo. School districts statewide face decisions on how and when to reopen their campuses. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

The pending reopening of K-12 campuses is suddenly at risk because of the ongoing surge of coronavirus cases, and all public and private schools must prepare for students to continue learning entirely from home, Los Angeles County’s top public health official has told local education leaders.

This sobering message was delivered by county Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer, in what she termed an “off the record” phone call Tuesday afternoon with district superintendents and others that was not intended for the media or the public. The Times obtained a recording of the call.

“Every single school district at this point needs to have plans in place to continue distance learning for 100% of

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Aunt of boy, 11, who died in ATV accident warns parents: ‘It was horrifying’

For many families, Fourth of July means enjoying outdoor activities together, and even though it’s a time to celebrate, taking precautions to protect your kids is still paramount.

That’s why Kristen Almer, whose 11-year-old nephew died in an all-terrain vehicle (ATV) accident in 2013, is calling on parents this weekend — and year round — to teach their kids about power sports safety.

According to a Consumer Federation of America report from 2018, July is the month with the most fatalities due to off-highway vehicles (OHVs), and the date with the highest number of fatalities is July 4.

Logan Almer’s story

On May 24, 2013, heading into Memorial Day weekend, Logan Almer, who lived with his father, mother and older brother in Minong, Wisconsin, got on his dad’s ATV when no adults were around, Almer told TODAY. He wasn’t wearing a helmet or other protective gear and drove the vehicle

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Los Angeles, Florida counties to close beaches for July 4th weekend; WHO warns ‘worst is yet to come’; 126K US deaths

As coronavirus cases climbed in the U.S. and across the globe, the World Health Organization director general warned “the worst is yet to come” and European Union leaders were ready to extend the ban on American travelers for at least two more weeks.

Adjustments were being made to help slow spreading of the disease. Jacksonville, Florida, which is scheduled to host the GOP convention, is mandating masks, though it’s not clear for how long. Broadway stages will remain dark through 2020. And beaches in Los Angeles and several Florida counties will be closed for Fourth of July weekend as cases surge.

Also, a drug company’s steep price for remdesivir, a drug that has shortened recovery times for severe COVID-19 patients by about 31%, is drawing criticism.

Some good news? The nation’s leading infectious diseases expert remains “cautiously optimistic” that a vaccine could be widely available by year’s end.

Here are

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No turning back for Florida, Texas? The next two weeks are ‘critical’ for US, Fauci warns

States have arrived at a crossroads that will define the coronavirus pandemic in the United States as half of the country struggles to manage rising COVID-19 cases, health experts say.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the top infectious disease expert at the National Institutes of Health, told Congress on Tuesday that the next two weeks will be “critical” in how the country addresses the surge in states like Florida, Texas and Arizona. 

Experts say states that don’t manage their case counts risk overwhelming the health care system again and infecting neighboring states that have already flattened the curve. While summer travel is expected to decline 15% from last year, AAA still projects 683 million road trips from July to September, which could spread the coronavirus.

All this could happen ahead of the fall, when the coronavirus may reappear in a second wave and likely be accompanied by the flu.

‘Grave concerns’: COVID-19’s

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No turning back for Florida, Texas? Why the next two weeks are ‘critical’ for US, Fauci warns

States have arrived at a crossroads that will define the coronavirus pandemic in the United States as half of the country struggles to manage rising COVID-19 cases, health experts say.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the top infectious disease expert at the National Institutes of Health, told Congress on Tuesday that the next two weeks will be “critical” in how the country addresses the surge in states like Florida, Texas and Arizona. 

Experts say states that don’t manage their case counts risk overwhelming the health care system again and infecting neighboring states that have already flattened the curve. While summer travel is expected to decline 15% from last year, AAA still projects 683 million road trips from July to September, which could spread coronavirus.

All this could happen ahead of the fall, when the coronavirus may reappear in a second wave and likely be accompanied by the flu.

‘Grave concerns’: COVID-19’s surge

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COVID-19 Will Rage ‘Like A Forest Fire’ In Unprepared America, Top Doc Warns

COVID-19 will rage “like a forest fire” in a U.S. that has no clear plan to deal with it and has regressed to a dismissive, “pre-pandemic” attitude, a top infectious disease expert said Sunday.

America’s leadership is unfocused, Dr. Michael Osterholm told Chuck Todd on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” unlike other parts of the world that remain vigilant against the pandemic.

The spread of COVID-19 is “like a forest fire,” warned Osterholm, the director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota.

“I don’t think that this is going to slow down. I think that wherever there is wood to burn, this fire is going to burn. And right now we have a lot of susceptible people,” he said.

“I don’t see this slowing down through the summer or into the fall. I don’t think we’re going to see one, two and three waves.

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