vaccine

Parents are wary of giving kids a Covid-19 vaccine. What if schools require it?

Michelle Vargas of Granite City, Illinois, has always vaccinated her 10-year-old daughter, Madison. They both typically get flu shots. But when a vaccine for the coronavirus eventually comes out, Vargas will not be giving it to her daughter — even if Madison’s school district requires it.

“There is no way in hell I would be playing politics with my daughter’s health and safety,” said Vargas, 36, an online fitness instructor. If the public school Madison attends and loves says the vaccine is mandatory, “we would find other options,” she said.

As pharmaceutical companies race to manufacture a Covid-19 vaccine, many people are wary of a shot that is working its way through the approval process at record speed during a highly politicized pandemic. While some professions could require employees to get the vaccine, experts say schools almost certainly will require students to — potentially setting the stage for a showdown

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J&J has started its late-stage coronavirus vaccine trial

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Hello,

Today in healthcare news: GoodRx is making its stock-market debut after pricing shares at $33 apiece just after midnight. At that price, the company is valued at $12.7 billion. What a time to be in the digital health/online prescription drug coupon business. 

Also: Johnson & Johnson has started a 60,000-person coronavirus vaccine trial, coronavirus deaths passed 200,000, and your ultimate guide to reading through vaccine data. 

Speaking of vaccines (and when are we not!):  Our biotech reporter Andrew Dunn is moderating a conversation on October 5 at 2 p.m. ET on the coronavirus vaccine race with 3 top experts:

  • Maria Elena Bottazzi, co-director of Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development

  • Art Caplan, bioethicist and

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Many parents are hesitant to give their kids a Covid-19 vaccine. What if schools require it?

Michelle Vargas of Granite City, Illinois, has always vaccinated her 10-year-old daughter, Madison. They both typically get flu shots. But when a vaccine for the coronavirus eventually comes out, Vargas will not be giving it to her daughter — even if Madison’s school district requires it.

“There is no way in hell I would be playing politics with my daughter’s health and safety,” said Vargas, 36, an online fitness instructor. If the public school Madison attends and loves says the vaccine is mandatory, “we would find other options,” she said.

As pharmaceutical companies race to manufacture a Covid-19 vaccine, many people are wary of a shot that is working its way through the approval process at record speed during a highly politicized pandemic. While some professions could require employees to get the vaccine, experts say schools almost certainly will require students to — potentially setting the stage for a showdown

Read More

We need to take advantage of every vaccine this winter to prevent another coronavirus outbreak

Currently, seasonal flu vaccines are designed against specific viral strains
Currently, seasonal flu vaccines are designed against specific viral strains

By extending the annual flu programme and making more people eligible for the free flu vaccine,  the government has signaled the importance of keeping people well, not just making them better.  

Inevitably, there will be challenges in implementing such a significant expansion of the UK’s immunisation programme. But that shouldn’t dissuade us from grasping a much wider opportunity to protect our precious NHS resources this, and every, winter.

Many of the UK’s most vulnerable adults are eligible for a range of vaccinations against infectious diseases – from pneumonia and shingles for the elderly, to whooping cough for pregnant women.  But we’re currently failing to realise the true value of these vaccinations, with uptake falling below what it could be. 

Unlocking the full potential of vaccination is an opportunity too important to miss. By ensuring more people take advantage of the

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Global cases surpass 30M; Moderna targets November for candidate vaccine; 790K more Americans file for unemployment

The worldwide total of known COVID-19 cases surpassed 30 million on Thursday and global fatalities crept closer to one million, both signs of the virus’ continuing global impact.

The World Health Organization said cases are surging again in Europe, with more than half of European countries seeing a 10% or greater spike in cases in the past two weeks. COVID-19 is also disproportionately affecting healthcare workers, according to WHO data. 

Health workers make up 2-3% of the global population but account for about 14% of reported COVID-19 cases. “Thousands of health workers infected with COVID-19 have lost their lives worldwide,” the organization said.

Meanwhile, progress toward a vaccine continued Thursday: Moderna said it was moving up its trial results timeline. The company said it could have enough clinical trial results for its candidate vaccine as soon as November.

That news followed cautions from Robert Redfield, director of the U.S. Centers

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Vaccine trial results could come in November; thousands of health workers have died; cases in Europe up

As the race to find a coronavirus vaccine continues, the World Health Organization on Thursday announced grim reminders of COVID-19’s global impact.

The WHO said cases are surging again in Europe, with more than half of European countries seeing a 10% or greater spike in cases. COVID-19 is also disproportionately affecting healthcare workers, according to WHO data. 

Health workers make up 2-3% of the global population but account for about 14% of reported COVID-19 cases. “Thousands of health workers infected with COVID-19 have lost their lives worldwide,” the organization said.

Meanwhile, progress towards a vaccine continued Thursday: Moderna said it was moving up its trial results timeline. The company said it could have enough clinical trial results for its candidate vaccine as soon as November.

That news followed cautions from Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, on Wednesday. Redfield urged the use of face masks

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Vaccine still 6-8 months away

ANNAPOLIS, Md. — It will likely be at least six to eight months longer before a coronavirus vaccine can be distributed in a best-case scenario, leading Maryland health officials and lawmakers said as they make plans for the state.

Senate President Bill Ferguson said he spoke on Tuesday with one of the principal investigators at Johns Hopkins University who is working on a vaccine now in its third phase. While there has been remarkable progress, Ferguson said Wednesday that the logistics that go into distributing a vaccine are “enormous and herculean.”

“I think it’s really important that we keep that in mind moving forward as we make decisions about the future of Maryland — that even with an amazing light-speed approval, it is still six to eight months from that point until we’ll start to see the impact on herd immunity overall, so there is time to go in this

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AstraZeneca resumes vaccine trial; Puerto Rico reopens beaches; US downgrades Mexico travel warning

Drug developers are racing to create a COVID-19 vaccine, but a post-pandemic world won’t suddenly arrive when one is successfully developed. 

But a return to “normal living” won’t come until “several months” after a vaccine first arrives, Dr. Anthony Fauci said on CNN. That’s likely to be about a year away, as a successful vaccine still needs to be manufactured and distributed at a massive scale.

In the meantime, Americans are learning more about risks associated with several parts of normal life that remain. Recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention studies documented health challenges in dining and daycare. One study found dining out was linked with higher infection rates in adults. Another study documented children who were infected in daycare and spread the virus at home. 

Meanwhile colleges continue to be hotspots for the virus: Of the 25 hottest outbreaks in the U.S., communities heavy with college students

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Vaccine won’t immediately end pandemic, Fauci says; Puerto Rico reopens beaches; US downgrades Mexico travel warning

Drug developers are racing to create a vaccine, but a post-pandemic world won’t suddenly arrive when one is successfully developed. 

A return to “normal living” won’t come until “several months” after a vaccine first arrives, Dr. Anthony Fauci said on CNN. That’s likely to be about a year away, as a successful vaccine still needs to be manufactured and distributed at a massive scale.

In the meantime, Americans are learning more about risks associated with several parts of normal life that remain. Recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention studies documented health challenges in dining and daycare. One study found dining out was linked with higher infection rates in adults. Another study documented children who were infected in daycare and spread the virus at home. 

Meanwhile colleges continue to be hotspots for the virus: Of the 25 hottest outbreaks in the U.S., communities heavy with college students represent 19

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‘Normal living’ will come months after vaccine, Fauci says; Florida bars to re-open at half-capacity

On the anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attack, Americans are struggling with feelings of safety once again as another American is diagnosed with the coronavirus every 2.45 seconds.

While a race to a vaccine is widely considered the only path back to a pre-pandemic way of life, Dr. Anthony Fauci cautioned that a safe and effective vaccine will not immediately bring back normalcy.

A return to “normal living” — life without masks and physical distancing, where people can go to a movie or a large gathering without fear of becoming infected with COVID-19 — won’t come until “several months” after a vaccine first arrives, Fauci, said on CNN.

The director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases said infection rates need to drop dramatically, something expected after the months-long logistical nightmare of manufacturing hundreds of millions of vaccines and distributing them.

Meanwhile, most state case counts

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