Trumps

Doctors, teachers reject Trump’s pressure to reopen U.S. schools

By Susan Heavey

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Groups representing the nation’s doctors, teachers and top school officials on Friday pushed back against pressure from President Donald Trump to fully reopen U.S. schools despite a surge in coronavirus cases, saying science must guide the decisions.

“Public health agencies must make recommendations based on evidence, not politics,” the American Academy of Pediatrics, two national teachers’ unions and a school superintendents’ group said, following days of threats by Trump to choke off federal education funds if schools do not open their doors for the upcoming academic year.

“We should leave it to health experts to tell us when the time is best to open up school buildings, and listen to educators and administrators to shape how we do it,” AAP, the American Federation of Teachers, the National Education Association and the School Superintendents Association said in a joint statement.

Their call was echoed by

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Trump’s Reckless Push To Reopen Schools Is An Admission Of Failure

By pushing to reopen schools this fall regardless of whether the coronavirus is still spreading wildly, President Donald Trump is giving up on his own plan to contain the virus. 

In April, the White House unveiled ”Guidelines for Opening Up America Again,” which call for business and other activities to resume in staggered phases, depending on local progress in containing the virus. 

The guidelines, which are influential but not binding, say states can enter the first phase of reopening if they have a “downward trajectory” of documented cases over 14 days or a lower percentage of positive tests over that time period. Schools should only reopen in the second phase ― after an additional two weeks with cases going down. 

Now, though, as the president insists against all evidence that the virus is under control ahead of the November election, those guidelines have gone out the window.

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Luca Guadagnino on Creating His HBO Series, Trump’s America, and Why He’s Remaking ‘Scarface’

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Luca Guadagnino, the Oscar-nominated auteur behind “Call Me By Your Name,” is taking his swooning, lyrical style to the small-screen with “We Are Who We Are,” an immersive and deeply moving coming-of-age story.

The HBO-Sky series, which debuts this September, follow two teenagers, Fraser (Jack Dylan Grazer) and Caitlin (Jordan Kristine Seamón), who live on a military base in Italy. It explores their burgeoning friendship — Fraser is artistic, shy, and volatile, while Caitlin is more outgoing, but also dealing with her own nagging insecurities. The series, Guadagnino’s first for TV, also grapples with issues of sexuality and gender identity. He directed all eight episodes of “We Are Who We Are,” and says he purposely set the show in the midst of the 2016 U.S. presidential election as a way to comment on the political tumult unleashed by Donald Trump’s victory.

More from

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Trump’s Twitch channel suspended, and Reddit bans pro-Trump online group

President Donald Trump and his followers took a double hit in online media Monday: Video streaming site Twitch suspended the president’s official channel, and popular website Reddit banned a group devoted to Trump.

Twitch, a video game-centric streaming site, suspended the official Donald Trump channel – launched in October 2019 – for violating its rules against hate speech. Among the violations were the rebroadcast of a presidential campaign rally in 2015, when Trump described immigrants crossing the border from Mexico.

“They’re sending people that have lots of problems, and they’re bringing those problems with us,” Trump said. “They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.”

That video was removed, as well as the broadcast of Trump’s rally this month in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where he described concerns about “a very tough hombre” breaking into homes.

Social media: Facebook, social networks under more pressure from

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Biden’s $80.8 Million Outpaced Trump’s Fundraising in May

Joe Biden, whose campaign had long struggled to raise money, zoomed past President Donald Trump’s fundraising machine in May for the first time, pulling in $80.8 million together with the Democratic National Committee, about 10% more than the $74 million Trump raised with the Republican Party.

It was a reversal of fortunes for the former vice president and a testament both to his growing support among small donors — more than half his donors in May were new to the campaign — and the advantages of his first full month of fundraising in concert with the DNC, in chunks of up to $620,000 per donor.

The $80.8 million that Biden raised was roughly one-third more than he raised in April, when Trump edged him slightly. The campaigns took in a total of nearly $155 million in May — about $5 million per day — despite a health and economic crisis

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10 mind-boggling and unhinged moments from Trump’s Tulsa rally

10 mind-boggling and unhinged moments from Trump's Tulsa rally
10 mind-boggling and unhinged moments from Trump’s Tulsa rally

Donald Trump’s first 2020 campaign rally in Tulsa, Okla. was jam-packed with a slew of confusing, cringe-worthy moments.

For those who didn’t watch live, the rally took place on Saturday night at the city’s Bank of Oklahoma Center. It’s also worth noting that it was held in the middle of a global pandemic, against the advice of medical professionals.

The president and attendees didn’t seem to be fazed by the threat of COVID-19, though. Social distancing was not strictly enforced in the arena, and few people were seen wearing masks – including Trump. But if you thought the lack of concern over health and safety would be the only newsworthy revelation to come out of this event, you’re wrong.

From rows and rows of empty seats, to careless comments about the coronavirus, Confederate monuments, protesters, and more, here are 10 of

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The Tulsa arena that’s hosting Trump’s rally is asking the campaign for its plan to keep people safe from the coronavirus because they still haven’t received one 2 days before the event

President Donald Trump addressing a campaign rally on October 10, 2019, in Minneapolis.
President Donald Trump addressing a campaign rally on October 10, 2019, in Minneapolis.

AP Photo/Jim Mone

  • President Donald Trump is scheduled to take the stage at the BOK Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on Saturday night for his first campaign rally since the coronavirus pandemic shut down most of the US.

  • To sign up for the rally online, prospective attendees must accept a warning about the novel coronavirus that absolves the Trump campaign and the venue of responsibility for “illness or injury.”

  • A spokeswoman for the BOK Center didn’t say whether employees would sign such a waiver, and told Business Insider on Thursday that the Trump campaign still hasn’t sent them a “written plan detailing the steps the event will institute for health and safety, including those related to social distancing.”

  • Experts worry the indoor rally, where thousands of people are expected to be in close contact for hours, is the

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