spread

LA’s Coronavirus Death Toll Is High, But The Spread Is Slowing

LOS ANGELES, CA — Los Angeles County reported another 48 coronavirus deaths Saturday, and though the daily death toll remains high, new cases and hospitalizations continue to fall, giving hope that the fewer people die will in the coming days.

Los Angeles County reported another 1,644 cases of COVID-19 Saturday, bringing the county’s totals to 230,662 cases and 5,537 fatalities. With the coronavirus, hope has proven to be somewhat precarious. The last time the region slowed the outbreak and loosened restrictions, a surge in new cases followed. Having learned from the July surge, county health officials are sounding the alarm about the upcoming Labor Day weekend. Those who want to see schools and businesses reopened should resist the urge to attend holiday weekend get togethers, warned county health officials.

Officials have hailed declining hospitalization numbers and testing-positivity rates in recent weeks as signs that the county has been successfully slowing

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LA cracks down on ‘nightclub’ house; Las Vegas casinos could be inflaming COVID spread; Florida marks 10K deaths

As COVID-19 outbreaks at schools continue to pop up causing students and staff in some states to quarantine, a new study suggests that children may play a larger role in community spread of the new virus than previously thought.

Researchers in Massachusetts found that some children who tested positive for COVID-19 had significantly higher levels of virus in their airways than hospitalized adults in intensive care units, according to the study published Thursday.

“Kids are not immune from this infection, and their symptoms don’t correlate with exposure and infection,” said Dr. Alessio Fasano, the study’s senior author.

Meanwhile, two days after the University of North Carolina announced it would pivot to online classes, university officials announced Wednesday that it would temporarily suspend all athletic activities until Thursday afternoon. The announcement comes after the athletics department said campus’ outbreak would not affect the football season.

Some significant developments:

  • Georgia Gov. Brian

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How to use ventilation and air filtration to prevent the spread of coronavirus indoors

<span class="caption">Open windows are the simplest way to increase air flow in a room.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/photo/man-with-mask-looking-out-of-window-royalty-free-image/1215148858?adppopup=true" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Justin Paget / Digital Vision via Getty Images"> Justin Paget / Digital Vision via Getty Images</a></span>
Open windows are the simplest way to increase air flow in a room. Justin Paget / Digital Vision via Getty Images

The vast majority of SARS-CoV-2 transmission occurs indoors, most of it from the inhalation of airborne particles that contain the coronavirus. The best way to prevent the virus from spreading in a home or business would be to simply keep infected people away. But this is hard to do when an estimated 40% of cases are asymptomatic and asymptomatic people can still spread the coronavirus to others.

Masks do a decent job at keeping the virus from spreading into the environment, but if an infected person is inside a building, inevitably some virus will escape into the air.

I am a professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Colorado Boulder. Much of my work has focused on how to control the transmission of airborne infectious diseases indoors, and

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Kids less likely to die from coronavirus, but schools could become hot spots for spread

A student gets his temperature checked by a teacher before entering a summer STEM camp at Wylie High School in Texas. Schools across the USA continue to plan on how to reopen schools this fall.
A student gets his temperature checked by a teacher before entering a summer STEM camp at Wylie High School in Texas. Schools across the USA continue to plan on how to reopen schools this fall.

As many school districts across the USA prepare to reopen campuses, some fear classrooms will become the next incubators for large coronavirus outbreaks.

Advocates for resuming school in person, including President Donald Trump, have repeatedly claimed that children pose less of a risk of spreading COVID-19 and that the benefits of returning them to the classroom outweigh the risks of keeping them home. 

Such statements have been used by conservatives, as well as many parents, to argue for a prompt reopening of classrooms.

“We know that children get the virus at a far lower rate than any other part of the population,” U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said during a CNN interview in July. “There’s

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Conspiracy theories around COVID-19 continue to spread. Experts weigh in on why people believe them.

More than 200 people gathered at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus to protest the face mask mandate that multiple counties are under in the state. (Photo: Megan Jelinger/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)
More than 200 people gathered at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus to protest the face mask mandate that multiple counties are under in the state. (Photo: Megan Jelinger/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

When Texas Rep. Louie Gohmert, a Republican who has publicly shunned face masks, tested positive for COVID-19 on Wednesday, the news sparked a chain reaction. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced new rules that required lawmakers to wear masks on the House floor, and several members of the House revealed that they were planning to go into quarantine. 

Soon after, Gohmert released a video on Twitter, revealing that he is asymptomatic. He then shared a conspiracy theory about wearing masks that, apparently, he also believes. Gohmert said he “can’t help but wonder” if he contracted COVID-19 from adjusting his mask with his hands. “It is interesting, and I don’t know about everybody, but when I have a mask

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Social media firms let misinformation spread ‘virulently’ on their platforms during Covid, say MPs

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TELEMMGLPICT000228734180.jpeg

Social media giants allowed misinformation about coronavirus to spread “virulently” across their platforms because duty of care laws are still not in place to regulate them, MPs say today.

The Commons culture committee cited evidence of a range of harms from dangerous hoax treatments and anti-vaccination propaganda to conspiracy theories that led to attacks on 5G engineers.

It said an online harms regulator must be appointed now to hold social media platforms to account and warned that until the proposed duty of care was introduced, internet companies would not be compelled to act.

MPs also accused the platforms of using business models which disincentivise action against misinformation while affording opportunities for some to monetise misleading content.

Julian Knight, chair of the committee, said: “We are calling on the Government to name the regulator now and get on with the ‘world-leading’ legislation on social media that we’ve long been promised.

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Harmful lies spread easily due to lack of UK law

Masks
Masks

Misleading and harmful online content about Covid-19 has spread “virulently” because the UK still lacks a law to regulate social media, an influential group of MPs has said.

The Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee urged the government to publish a draft copy of promised legislation by the autumn.

It follows suggestions the Online Harms Bill might not be in force until 2024.

The group’s chairman said tech firms could not be left to self-regulate.

“We still haven’t seen correct legislative architecture put in place, and we are still relying on social media companies’ consciences,” said Julian Knight.

“This just is not good enough. Our legislation is not in any way fit for purpose, and we’re still waiting. What I’ve seen so far has just been quite a lot of delay.”

Google and Facebook have said they have invested in measures to tackle posts that breach their guidelines.

But

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More than half of all states, including California and Michigan, pause reopening or take steps to halt the spread of COVID-19

A week after the United States surpassed 3,000,000 coronavirus cases — around a quarter of the world’s cases and deaths — the coronavirus pandemic continues unabated. 

Governors and other leaders in states including California, Texas and Michigan continue to grapple with plans to reopen their economies – or slow them down again – amid this severe uptick in cases. Twenty-five states have taken action to cut down on skyrocketing COVID-19 cases.

Among measures on the table: shutting down high-capacity businesses such as bars and gyms, halting elective surgeries and requiring people to wear masks. 

Here is a look at which states have paused their reopening or taken other steps. This list is continually updated.

Alabama

After days of an “alarming” upward climb in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations, Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey announced she will enforce a statewide mask order starting July 16. 

Ivey had previously said she believed a statewide

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Why the government needs ‘maskfluencers’ to help spread the cover-up message

Maskfluencers jennifer aniston ivanka trump - Instagram: @JenniferAniston / Getty Images
Maskfluencers jennifer aniston ivanka trump – Instagram: @JenniferAniston / Getty Images

So you’re going to need a mask. The trouble is that wearing one isn’t easy or pleasant. It can feel claustrophobic, anonymising, steamy. The Government waited so long to mandate mask-wearing (they have been compulsory when on public transport and while shopping in Germany since April) that many people remain sceptical of their efficacy, as well as annoyed that they have to wear one at all.

To flip the social norm from not wearing masks to wearing them, the Government will need strong enforcement of the new law. And the support of some well-positioned maskfluencers. 

A maskfluencer, or mask influencer, can be anyone who makes mask-wearing look appealing enough to nudge us towards covering up. The Queen and Sir David Attenborough have been floated as ideal maskfluencers – public figures beyond reproach, who can sway the attitudes of a

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Do children spread coronavirus? What doctors say about going back to school

President Donald Trump is pressing state and local officials to reopen schools this fall, despite coronavirus infections surging nationwide. While experts say there are significant social benefits to resuming in-person classes, they caution that schools will need to balance those against potential risks to provide a safe learning environment for students — as well as teachers and administrators.

Evidence suggests that children are not as susceptible as adults to COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. Even among those who have been infected, it’s relatively rare for children to develop serious complications or require hospitalization.

But this doesn’t mean classrooms can be exempt from social distancing and other safety precautions, particularly if schools intend to welcome kids back on site in less than two months.

“It really shouldn’t be a debate of getting kids back to school, but getting kids back to school safely,” said Dr. Jennifer Lighter, a pediatric

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