schools

You can’t reopen Florida schools when thousands of children are infected with COVID

In a blunt and candid response delivered in the midst of a recharged coronavirus crisis sweeping through Florida, Miami-Dade’s Superintendent of Schools confessed that he can’t “guarantee” social distancing when schools open in the fall.

Of course he can’t.

Kids will be kids — and Miami-Dade’s school district is the fourth-largest in the nation.

That’s a heady combination.

Crowded halls. Crowded classrooms. Crowded cafeterias.

“Part of the [reopening] plan relies on increased social distancing, but we cannot guarantee six feet of distance,” Alberto Carvalho said during a virtual School Board meeting to vote on an opening plan for the fall that — thankfully — gives parents options.

Because the times aren’t right for a return to campus at all.

The hot summer months were supposed to bring less coronavirus infection, but the complete opposite has happened. Florida is seeing record numbers of coronavirus cases — not only in the 18-34

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If schools don’t reopen, will parents have to choose between jobs and kids?

With as little as a month before school starts in some areas and COVID-19 diagnoses spiking in some of those same places, parents are wondering whether they have to choose between their jobs and their kids.

“This situation isn’t just untenable, it’s impossible.”

After word reached parents in New York City that the department of education was considering a hybrid plan for reopening schools that would allow students at school for part of the week, Smitten Kitchen founder Deb Perelman tweeted what she later called the “primal scream that we — and countless other parents for whom this situation isn’t just untenable, it’s impossible — have been feeling since March.”

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Perelman said a hybrid reopening plan would leave working parents “ground up in the gears” between reopened cities and closed or partially closed schools.

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“I wish someone would just say the quiet part out loud,” Perelman tweeted. “In

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Child activity levels plunging, warn schools, as PE funding campaign gathers pace

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Activity levels amongst children have “significantly dropped” in the latter stages of lockdown, headteachers have warned, as the Government comes under renewed pressure to guarantee primary school sport funding.

Christine Ohuruogu, the former Olympic, World and Commonwealth 400m champion, and Nicky Butt, the ex-Manchester United and England midfielder, have also added their support to an open letter calling for Prime Minister Boris Johnson to help.

Concern centres on the £320 million PE and Sport Premium, which is largely funded by the Sugar Tax, and which the Government has so far refused to guarantee from the next academic year in September.

The Government is expected to respond to the campaign by the end of the week, prompting primary schools across the UK to lay bare a potential crisis in

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New ‘pandemic potential’ found in China; Arizona delays opening of schools; kids sports march on

A new pandemic threat could be simmering in China while at home more states are tightening restrictions aimed at tamping down an alarming boom in coronavirus cases.

Arizona delayed the start for in-class learning for the 2020-21 school year. Oregon and Kansas are the latest states that will begin to require face masks in public.

“Modeling from the Oregon Health Authority shows that if we don’t take further action to reduce the spread of the disease, our hospitals could be overwhelmed by new COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations within weeks,” Oregon Gov. Kate Brown said. “The choices every single one of us make in the coming days matter.”

In New Jersey, Gov. Phil Murphy announced late Monday that the state would pause its planned reopening for indoor dining and banned smoking and drinking at Atlantic City casinos set to reopen this week.

And in China, researchers are concerned about a new

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Miami leaders have a few models for reopening schools. It’s up to parents to decide.

Miami-Dade County Public Schools’ plans keep shifting as coronavirus cases continue to spike exponentially.

The school district was due to announce its plan to reopen schools for the 2020-21 school year on Wednesday but postponed to squeeze in one more meeting with its work group of medical professionals and community members. The full plan will be presented at a special School Board meeting Wednesday, July 1.

“After the last Zoom call, as a parent, grandparent, I was extremely nervous and upset,” said Eileen Segal of the Family & Community Involvement Advisory Committee on Wednesday. “After listening today I feel a lot calmer.”

On Friday, the 23-member work group met virtually again to go over a revised draft plan. Seven models of how instruction would take place were whittled to four: A daily attendance at the schoolhouse model with reduced class sizes and social distancing; two hybrid models of in-person and

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Miami officials have a few models for reopening schools. It’s up to parents to decide.

Miami-Dade County Public Schools’ plans keep shifting as coronavirus cases continue to spike exponentially.

The school district was due to announce its plan to reopen schools for the 2020-21 school year on Wednesday but postponed to squeeze in one more meeting with its work group of medical professionals and community members. The full plan will be presented at a special School Board meeting Wednesday, July 1.

“After the last Zoom call, as a parent, grandparent, I was extremely nervous and upset,” said Eileen Segal of the Family & Community Involvement Advisory Committee on Wednesday. “After listening today I feel a lot calmer.”

On Friday, the 23-member work group met virtually again to go over a revised draft plan. Seven models of how instruction would take place were whittled to four: A daily attendance at the schoolhouse model with reduced class sizes and social distancing; two hybrid models of in-person and

Read More

As universities plan for students’ return amid coronavirus, some schools worry about risky ‘culture’

Heather Adams, a rising junior at American University, recently came to terms with a new reality: she won’t be heading back to campus in Washington, D.C. this fall. Though her school announced precautions to help keep students safe from the novel coronavirus, Adams said she wasn’t convinced.

“It feels like they are opening up irresponsibly and for their own benefit to get more money and I don’t feel like they’re really taking our safety into account as much as they need to,” Adams said.

Dana Damiani, a rising senior at Nazareth College in New York, however, isn’t about to miss her last year.

“I decided to go back because I have one year left and I trust my professors and the university to keep me safe,” said Damiani. “I am not going to stay home when I have the chance to be with my friends and take classes on campus.”

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Reopening technical schools offer preview for fall colleges

MILWAUKEE – Under normal circumstances, there would be nothing particularly extraordinary about a group of aspiring surgical technicians gathering for a lab course at Milwaukee Area Technical College.

But when a group of seven students sat around a room at the school’s downtown campus earlier this month, they became some of the first collegians to return to the classrooms they had walked away from when the coronavirus pandemic hit. They also got a glimpse of what things could look like for college students across the country come fall.

They all wore masks. They kept their distance when possible. They had their temperatures taken upon arrival and followed markings on the floor to their classrooms.

Kimberly Lopez of West Allis has her gown tied as instructor Mary Kunicki, program director for the surgical tech program, talks through the process of properly putting on a surgical gown for a surgical tech class at Milwaukee Area Technical College in Milwaukee.
Kimberly Lopez of West Allis has her gown tied as instructor Mary Kunicki, program director for the surgical tech program, talks through the process of properly putting on a surgical gown for a surgical tech class
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Schools aim to reopen but have few solutions

With the next academic year less than three months away, and no end in sight to the coronavirus pandemic, school districts face a daunting decision: Reopen the schools they shuttered, or continue to teach students remotely?

Educators across the United States are weighing their options, taking into account the quality of the education they can offer, the need for children to socialize and keeping safety in mind above all else.

So far, a hybrid model that combines some in-person learning and some remote learning has emerged as the most popular proposal for the fall, according to Dan Domenech, the executive director of AASA, The School Superintendents Association, an advocacy organization for the 14,000 superintendents in the U.S.

That could mean a school has as little as 25 percent of its normal capacity in the building at once, which would give students more space for social distancing in their classrooms and

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In-person classes, online learning or a mix? Reopening schools will bring new struggles

With the next academic year less than three months away, and no end in sight to the coronavirus pandemic, school districts face a daunting decision: Reopen the schools they shuttered, or continue to teach students remotely?

Educators across the United States are weighing their options, taking into account the quality of the education they can offer, the need for children to socialize and keeping safety in mind above all else.

So far, a hybrid model that combines some in-person learning and some remote learning has emerged as the most popular proposal for the fall, according to Dan Domenech, the executive director of AASA, The School Superintendents Association, an advocacy organization for the 14,000 superintendents in the U.S.

That could mean a school has as little as 25 percent of its normal capacity in the building at once, which would give students more space for social distancing in their classrooms and

Read More