rally

Future Trump Rally Sites Brace as His COVID Roadshow Comes to Town

Bloomberg/Getty
Bloomberg/Getty

These days, President Donald Trump’s insatiable cravings for a crowd means asking his fans and supporters to risk their health by packing together indoors despite deep concerns from health experts. 

As Trump rallied largely unmasked supporters in Tulsa, Oklahoma, over the weekend,  Arizonans more than a thousand miles away watched warily,  knowing that days later it would be their turn to balance keeping the public safe with Trump’s eagerness to return to his cherished rally format. 

“I think the bigger problem, more than just the spreading at this particular event, is the message that it sends to the community because you have the president and then the governor endorsing large-scale events like this with ambiguous mitigation measures in place,” said Will Humble, the executive director of the Arizona Public Health Association.

The president’s visit comes as hospital-specific COVID-19 figures hit new highs, according to The Arizona Republic. Intensive care

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How TikTok teens trolled the Trump campaign ahead of Tulsa rally

Users on the social media app TikTok are claiming some credit for the disappointing turnout at the president’s rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, over the weekend, after a weeks-long campaign to artificially inflate the number of people registered to attend. The prank may have helped lead the Trump campaign to boast about more than a million people seeking tickets for the rally — while only about 6,200 ended up filling seats.

In the weeks leading up to the rally, TikTok users started spreading the idea of registering for free tickets with no intention of going — in hopes that they would take seats away from Trump supporters, and leave the president speaking to a hollowed-out stadium.

One of the most prominent posts about the prank came from 51-year-old Mary Jo Laupp, an Iowa woman who worked on Pete Buttigieg’s presidential campaign.

“I recommend that all of us who want to

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Homicide in Seattle autonomous zone being investigated; Trump rally draws smaller-than-expected crowds

Police are investigating a homicide inside the Seattle autonomous zone. The shooting Saturday morning left one person dead and another hospitalized with life-threatening injuries.

President Donald Trump’s Saturday rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma hosted a smaller-than-usual crowd, with empty seats in the 19,000-capacity BOK Center.

Trump’s campaign canceled planned outdoor speeches before his rally.Campaign spokesperson Tim Murtaugh said the cancelation was because of protests outside. But journalists on the ground refuted seeing large numbers of individuals turned away due to protesters.

Trump had initially planned a campaign rally in Tulsa on Friday but later rescheduled to Saturday after learning about the significance of Juneteenth. The city is also where a white mob destroyed the “Black Wall Street” in 1921. 

A closer look at some recent developments:

  • Seattle Police are investigating a homicide that happened early Saturday in which one person was killed and another in critical condition in Seattle’s “Capitol Hill

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10 mind-boggling and unhinged moments from Trump’s Tulsa rally

10 mind-boggling and unhinged moments from Trump's Tulsa rally
10 mind-boggling and unhinged moments from Trump’s Tulsa rally

Donald Trump’s first 2020 campaign rally in Tulsa, Okla. was jam-packed with a slew of confusing, cringe-worthy moments.

For those who didn’t watch live, the rally took place on Saturday night at the city’s Bank of Oklahoma Center. It’s also worth noting that it was held in the middle of a global pandemic, against the advice of medical professionals.

The president and attendees didn’t seem to be fazed by the threat of COVID-19, though. Social distancing was not strictly enforced in the arena, and few people were seen wearing masks – including Trump. But if you thought the lack of concern over health and safety would be the only newsworthy revelation to come out of this event, you’re wrong.

From rows and rows of empty seats, to careless comments about the coronavirus, Confederate monuments, protesters, and more, here are 10 of

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Donald Trump sows division and promises ‘greatness’ at Tulsa rally flop

Donald Trump declared “the silent majority is stronger than ever before” at his comeback rally on Saturday, but thousands of empty seats appeared to tell a different story.

The US president’s much hyped return to the campaign trail turned to humiliation when he failed to fill a 19,000-capacity arena in the Republican stronghold of Oklahoma, raising fresh doubts about his chances of winning re-election.

“The Emperor has no crowd,” tweeted Dan Pfeiffer, a former senior adviser to Barack Obama.

The overwhelmingly white gathering at Trump’s first rally since March was dwarfed by the huge multiracial crowds that have marched for Black Lives Matter across the country in recent weeks, reinforcing criticism that the president is badly out of step with the national mood.

Related: Donald Trump calls Covid-19 ‘kung flu’ at Tulsa rally

The flop in Tulsa was an unexpected anticlimax for an event that seemed to offer a combustible

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Trump Admits at Smaller-Than-Billed Tulsa Rally He Slowed Coronavirus Testing to Hide Scope of U.S. Spread

President Donald Trump returned to the campaign trail on Saturday to his supporters gathered at a rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, amid the coronavirus pandemic and the nationwide protests occurring across the country in the wake of George Floyd’s death.

Trump’s rally was held at the Bank of Oklahoma Center, which seats a total of 19,000 guests. Though Trump, 74, anticipated a packed audience, the upper decks of the arena remained empty.

And less than two hours before the rally, Trump and Vice President Mike Pence were expected to make remarks to the overflow crowd outside the arena. However, after supporters did not gather in the outdoor areas, plans to address the overflow crowd were canceled.

Before entering, rally attendees reportedly had the option to have their temperatures checked and be given masks and hand sanitizer for the large indoor event. Inside the event, many did not appear to be wearing

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The Tulsa arena that’s hosting Trump’s rally is asking the campaign for its plan to keep people safe from the coronavirus because they still haven’t received one 2 days before the event

President Donald Trump addressing a campaign rally on October 10, 2019, in Minneapolis.
President Donald Trump addressing a campaign rally on October 10, 2019, in Minneapolis.

AP Photo/Jim Mone

  • President Donald Trump is scheduled to take the stage at the BOK Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on Saturday night for his first campaign rally since the coronavirus pandemic shut down most of the US.

  • To sign up for the rally online, prospective attendees must accept a warning about the novel coronavirus that absolves the Trump campaign and the venue of responsibility for “illness or injury.”

  • A spokeswoman for the BOK Center didn’t say whether employees would sign such a waiver, and told Business Insider on Thursday that the Trump campaign still hasn’t sent them a “written plan detailing the steps the event will institute for health and safety, including those related to social distancing.”

  • Experts worry the indoor rally, where thousands of people are expected to be in close contact for hours, is the

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Black drag queens rally support for Black Lives Matter and Pride

Jo Mama’s friends warned her not to protest against police brutality while dressed in drag. If something happened, they argued, people could grab items off of her, or she could become a target.

“So I went in drag on purpose. Kind of in defiance, to be like, ‘You’re going see me,’” the Chicago queen said. “I’m going to be present. You can’t miss me and you’re going to hear my voice.”

With Pride month celebrations halted amid the coronavirus pandemic, Black drag queens are continuing their legacy of protesting inequalities in the U.S. by taking to the streets in support of the Black Lives Matter movement, donating to social justice organizations, supporting Black businesses and using their social media platforms to spread messages of support and to share resources. All while wearing glitter-flecked dresses, high heels, wigs and masks. 

Their advocacy comes as protests have unfolded across the nation in

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