people

spotlight falls on secretive Catholic group People of Praise

<span>Photograph: Karen Pulfer Focht/Reuters</span>
Photograph: Karen Pulfer Focht/Reuters

Donald Trump’s expected nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the supreme court, to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg, is drawing attention to a secretive Catholic “covenant community” called People of Praise that counts Barrett as a member and faces claims of adhering to a “highly authoritarian” structure.

Related: Donald Trump set to nominate Amy Coney Barrett to supreme court – live

The 48-year-old appellate court judge has said she is a “faithful Catholic” but that her religious beliefs would not “bear in the discharge of my duties as a judge”.

At the same time, the Louisiana native and Notre Dame Law graduate, a favorite among Trump’s evangelical Christian base, has said legal careers ought not to be seen as means of gaining satisfaction, prestige or money, but rather “as a means to the end of serving God”.

Interviews with experts who have studied charismatic Christian groups such

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Canada Recovery Benefit unveiled, ‘No value’ in swabbing asymptomatic people, doctors warn

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety.

Currently, there are more than 6,771 active cases of COVID-19 in Canada (with more than 134,900 diagnoses so far) and 9,100 deaths. Nearly 90 per cent of the country’s reported COVID-19 cases have recovered.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

September 24

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‘No value’ in swabbing asymptomatic people, Ontario invests $1B to expand testing

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety.

Currently, there are more than 6,771 active cases of COVID-19 in Canada (with more than 134,900 diagnoses so far) and 9,100 deaths. Nearly 90 per cent of the country’s reported COVID-19 cases have recovered.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

September 24

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Police have shot people experiencing a mental health crisis. Who should you call instead?

Daniel Prude was experiencing a mental health crisis in March when Rochester, New York, police officers responding to a 911 call pinned him to the pavement while handcuffed and naked, suffocating him to death.

A month later, Nicolas Chavez, 27, was “having a mental breakdown” in Houston when he was shot 21 times, with 28 officers on the scene.

And last week, 13-year-old Linden Cameron, who has autism, was having an episode when officers shot him, leaving him with injuries to his shoulder, ankles, intestines and bladder.

Amid a nationwide movement for racial justice and police reform sparked by the recent killings of several Black men and women, many people have spoken out against police shootings of people experiencing mental health crises. While some are calling for departments to require more training in crisis intervention, others are promoting alternative emergency responder programs.

“A person shouldn’t lose their life because they’re

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How ASMR is helping people cope during the COVID-19 pandemic

Elana Morris hasn’t been sleeping well in 2020.

Between the constant flurry of news about the coronavirus pandemic and the feeling of isolation brought on by shutdowns and social distancing, the 21-year-old University of Maryland journalism student finds it difficult to quiet her mind and sleep.

But Morris has a secret weapon against her quarantine-related insomnia: ASMR.

ASMR, which stands for autonomous sensory meridian response, is often described as a tingling that starts in the head and moves down the spine. Not everyone feels this sensation, but those who do say it helps relieve stress and induce sleep.

There are thousands of ASMR videos on Youtube and they vary widely in subject. Examples include close-ups of people eating crunchy foods, whispering, crinkling paper, tapping on glass and brushing hair. Though they started as a fringe trend around 2009, the phenomenon has grown in popularity with one of the most popular

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Why calorie-labelling is dangerous for people with eating disorders

Emma de Saram, who is in recovery after living with anorexia for a number of years, with her mother, Carole - JAY WILLIAMS
Emma de Saram, who is in recovery after living with anorexia for a number of years, with her mother, Carole – JAY WILLIAMS

‘I’ve spent years using up precious brain capacity calculating calories. My life revolved around it,” says 20-year-old Emma de Saram. “I’m still trying to unwire my brain from seeing a plate of food as numbers, to see food as something I need to exist.”

The Exeter University student, who was diagnosed with anorexia in 2016, is in recovery after going through years of treatment. She’s now at the point where she can enjoy going out to restaurants and cafés. But there’s always the lingering worry that this will trigger her symptoms and then derail her recovery.

“It depends on how I’m feeling that day, but the food might come, and I see a little oil on it, and I think “Oh my god, how am I going

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Drive urging people back to the office on ice after fears of spike in cases

Plan to encourage mass return to work on hold - Getty
Plan to encourage mass return to work on hold – Getty
Coronavirus Article Bar with counter
Coronavirus Article Bar with counter

A Government drive to encourage millions of people working at home to go back to the office has been put on ice over concerns of a spike in coronavirus cases, the Telegraph can disclose.

Amid signs of confusion at the heart of Cabinet, ministers are understood to have rowed back on plans to launch a major campaign to urge office workers to return to their desks and start commuting again.

They fear any mass return could send infections soaring, and threaten the planned return of thousands of children to school over the next few weeks.

Follow the latest updates below.

05:25 AM

Warning reopening universities ‘encouraging a public health crisis’

Universities could become ground zero for a second wave of Covid-19 in the UK unless they avoid face-to-face teaching, it has been reported.

The

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‘People Thought I Was Crazy’

Contagion made her uniquely prepared for the current coronavirus pandemic.” data-reactid=”20″Kate Winslet’s role as an epidemiologist in 2011’s Contagion made her uniquely prepared for the current coronavirus pandemic.

The Hollywood Reporter in a new cover story that her time working on Steven Soderbergh’s Contagion made her hyper-aware when the coronavirus began spreading in China and Europe. She had been shooting in Philadelphia when the virus started making news.” data-reactid=”21″The actress, 44, whose starring in the upcoming Ammonite, told The Hollywood Reporter in a new cover story that her time working on Steven Soderbergh’s Contagion made her hyper-aware when the coronavirus began spreading in China and Europe. She had been shooting in Philadelphia when the virus started making news.

“People thought I was crazy because I had been walking around wearing

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CDC changes testing guidelines for asymptomatic people; University of Alabama cases skyrocket; 2 reinfections in Europe

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has changed its COVID-19 testing guidelines and now says people without symptoms “do not necessarily need a test” – even if they’ve been exposed to COVID-19.

The move comes a week after the CDC updated travel guidelines that no longer mandate a 14-day quarantine for anyone who’s traveled outside of their state or the country. The revisions to CDC guidelines have been met with concern by medical experts, who caution that less testing may lead to more cases and hinder contact tracing efforts. 

Tensions between the federal government and scientists remain high: Earlier this week, some doctors spoke out against the approval of blood plasma as a COVID-19 treatment, saying  the Food and Drug Administration offered shaky data to justify its approval of the treatment. 

Meanwhile, efforts to learn more about how the virus spreads remain unwavering. Researchers in Massachusetts are tracking the

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CDC changes testing guidelines for asymptomatic people; University of Alabama has 560 cases; two reinfections in Europe

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has changed its COVID-19 testing guidelines. Now, the CDC says, people without symptoms “do not necessarily need a test” – even if they’ve been exposed to COVID-19.

In Hawaii, its most populous island is returning to stay-at-home orders in its fight against COVID-19, while Massachusetts is learning the startling story of the virus’ arrival through new genetic data.

Meanwhile, new research that has not yet undergone scientific peer review is tracking “superspreader events” that could help states decide what events or activities are safe during the ongoing pandemic.

Also Tuesday, Los Angeles County – the county with the highest number of infections in the U.S. – reported fewer than 1,000 cases for the first time since early June.

Some significant developments:

📈 Today’s numbers: The U.S. has more than 5.7 million confirmed infections and 178,000 deaths. Worldwide, there have been more than 820,000 

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