forced

10 Steps to Take When You’re Facing a Forced Retirement

You spend decades of your life working toward the goal of retiring someday. There’s a ton of guesswork involved about when it will happen, how much you’ll need each year and even how long you’re expecting to live.

But when retirement happens sooner than you anticipated — due to a layoff, health issue or some other life event — your decades of retirement planning gets thrown off course.

Suddenly, your time to save is over. Now you have to make less money last even longer than you’d imagined.

10 Steps to Take When You’re Forced to Retire Early

Whether you’ve been forced to retire early due to circumstances beyond your control or you’re preparing for a worst-case scenario, know you still have options for a financially sound retirement. Follow these steps to help you adjust your plans.

1. Find Affordable Health Coverage

When you have to retire early, you’re hit

Read More

‘We’re forced to choose between our livelihoods and our lives’

Designed to measure fitness, character and competence, the bar exam is a grueling 12-hour test typically administered over a two-day period to thousands of recent law school graduates.

But with coronavirus cases still surging in many parts of the nation, some law school graduates view this communal experience not as a shared rite of passage but as a potentially life-threatening risk.

One person worried about the uncertainties of the in-person bar exam is aspiring child protection lawyer Mollie McGuire of Chicago.

McGuire, along with Dalton Hughes and Steven Tinetti, formally filed a legal petition with the Illinois Supreme Court, asking the state’s highest court to grant 2020 law school graduates diploma privilege, meaning they could practice law without sitting for the bar exam. Nearly 1,400 law school graduates, faculty members, lawyers and health care workers signed on to support the effort.

In its response, the Illinois Board of Admissions to

Read More

‘We’re forced to choose between our livelihoods and our lives’

Designed to measure fitness, character and competence, the bar exam is a grueling 12-hour test typically administered over a two-day period to thousands of recent law school graduates.

But with coronavirus cases still surging in many parts of the nation, some law school graduates view this communal experience not as a shared rite of passage but as a potentially life-threatening risk.

One person worried about the uncertainties of the in-person bar exam is aspiring child protection lawyer Mollie McGuire of Chicago.

McGuire, along with Dalton Hughes and Steven Tinetti, formally filed a legal petition with the Illinois Supreme Court, asking the state’s highest court to grant 2020 law school graduates diploma privilege, meaning they could practice law without sitting for the bar exam. Nearly 1,400 law school graduates, faculty members, lawyers and health care workers signed on to support the effort.

In its response, the Illinois Board of Admissions to

Read More

California high school sports forced into three-month delay

The coronavirus pandemic prompted California to spike all fall high school sports on Monday, in favor of a new calendar that will compact all games, like football, into a few winter and spring months.

The California Interscholastic Federation, which regulates high school sports, won’t stage any games in any sports until at least December, officials said.

The new calendar would mean football — a staple of fall Friday nights across America’s largest state — would be played in the spring with the last game played no later than April 17, 2021, the CIF announced.

CIF Southern Section Commissioner Rob Wigod admitted the calendar not ideal. But because so many California schools have said they’re going to start the fall term with just online instruction, this was the only option short of canceling whole seasons.

“The alternative would be to just cancel an entire season or seasons, In other words, since

Read More

Texas Doctor Forced to Choose Which COVID-19 Patients Get Beds as Hospital Is Overwhelmed with Cases

As the number of coronavirus cases in the U.S. continues to rise, a doctor in San Antonio, Texas, has been forced to make the difficult decision of choosing which of the patients currently fighting for their lives get to be placed in hospital beds.

Dr. Jeffrey DellaVolpe, a pulmonologist and the director of the ECMO program at San Antonio Methodist Hospital told CNN that this explosion of cases is not something he and other healthcare professionals were at all prepared for.

“Yesterday was probably the worst day I ever had,” DellaVolpe said. “I got 10 calls. Young people who would otherwise be excellent candidates to be able to put on ECMO.”

ECMO (Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation), is a therapy that adds oxygen to one’s blood and pumps it through their body.

“They’re so sick that if they don’t get put on, if they don’t get the support, they are going to

Read More

Meet the grandparents forced to choose between family and health

As lockdown eases, grandparents across the nation face a difficult decision - Andrew Fox
As lockdown eases, grandparents across the nation face a difficult decision – Andrew Fox

We knew already, if we were fortunate, that the grandparent relationship was special.

I knew it 18 years ago when my father-in-law (who sadly died eight years ago) cradled our newborn and spoke to him in a voice I’d never heard before. I knew it when my mother-in-law saw genius in the way our son drank water from his bottle.

I knew it from the way my mother pealed with laughter as she recounted instances of my children’s verve – and nerve – on their gallery and restaurant visits.
Since March, for their own safety, these women, tactile and adoring, have been carefully distant. There has been no hanging out with grandma. Rather, there has been stilted exchanges via video call and awkward waves from the end of the drive.

During lockdown, our youngest, 13, all

Read More

Public health workers fighting COVID-19 are threatened, forced out of jobs

Emily Brown was stretched thin.

As the director of the Rio Grande County Public Health Department in rural Colorado, she was working 12- and 14-hour days, struggling to respond to the pandemic with only five full-time employees for more than 11,000 residents. Case counts were rising.

Full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak

She was already at odds with county commissioners, who were pushing to loosen public health restrictions in late May, against her advice. She had previously clashed with them over data releases and control and had haggled over a variance regarding reopening businesses.

But she reasoned that standing up for public health principles was worth it, even if she risked losing the job that allowed her to live close to her hometown and help her parents with their farm.

Then came the Facebook post: a photo of her and other health officials with comments about their weight and references

Read More

Two million people forced to shield from Covid-19 to be released at ‘end of July’

Boris Johnson
Boris Johnson

More than 2 million people who are under orders to stay home and be fully “shielded” will be told they can stop isolating at the end of next month, it has emerged.

After being forced to “cocoon” themselves at home since the beginning of lockdown, members of the public classed as extremely vulnerable to Covid-19 are reportedly to be released from self-isolation at the end of July.

Whilst Downing Street insisted that no final decision had been made, other Government sources said reports that the policy will be relaxed in July were accurate.

Separately, senior Cabinet members indicated that two other major lockdown relaxations – cutting the two-metre social distancing rule and the creation of air bridges for British holidaymakers – were expected to be finalised by the “end of next week”.

Speaking to The Telegraph, a senior minister said a Downing Street review of the two-metre rule

Read More