Florida

Big Ten schools to only play conference games; CDC won’t rewrite school guidelines; Florida sees record death total

Florida saw an alarming increase in deaths and top federal health officials ran counter to President Donald Trump’s wishes, saying guidelines for reopening schools won’t be rewritten and some states should consider shutting down again as coronavirus cases spike nationwide Thursday.

The Big Ten announced it will limit its fall sports to only conference games, impacting several significant scheduled football games. The ACC pushed the start of its season back to Sept. 1.

Florida reported 120 deaths – almost 50% more than the previous one-day high of 83 in late April – as the state surpassed 4,000 deaths. Nationwide, the Johns Hopkins data dashboard reported a one-day total of 820 U.S. deaths and a near-record 58,601 new cases.

“Any state that is having a serious problem, that state should seriously look at shutting down,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said on “The

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CDC won’t rewrite school guidelines; Florida district to ignore in-class mandate as numbers soar; Trump blames testing

Florida saw an alarming increase in deaths and top federal health officials ran counter to President Donald Trump’s wishes, saying guidelines for reopening schools won’t be rewritten and some states should consider shutting down again as coronavirus cases spike nationwide Thursday.

Florida reported 120 deaths – almost 50% more than the previous one-day high of 83 in late April – as the state surpassed 4,000 deaths. Nationwide, the Johns Hopkins data dashboard reported a one-day total of 820 U.S. deaths and a near-record 58,601 new cases.

“Any state that is having a serious problem, that state should seriously look at shutting down,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said on “The Journal” podcast.

Trump, who has complained that the CDC’s requirements for schools to reopen in the fall are too difficult and expensive, took to Twitter to blame increased testing for the nation’s

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Drug could be ready by summer’s end; Florida orders ‘brick and mortar’ schools to open; 130,000 US deaths

The U.S. coronavirus death toll has surpassed 130,000, but a U.S. pharmaceutical company says it could have initial doses of a drug ready by the end of summer that could treat or even prevent COVID-19.

A $450 million federal contract awarded Regeneron Pharmaceuticals could help get the drug to “many people quickly, hopefully helping to change the course of this deadly and still-raging pandemic,” the company said in a statement.

The news comes as confirmed cases surge across most of the U.S.; Dr. Anthony Fauci said the country is “still knee-deep in the first wave of this.” Arizona is one hot spot: The state surpassed 100,000 cases Monday, and more than 62,000 of the 101,441 reported cases involve people younger than 44, state officials said.

In Florida, another hot spot, the fall semester begins next month for public schools. The state’s education chief ordered school boards to “open brick and

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Florida Shatters Single-Day Record with Over 11,450 New Coronavirus Cases in Single Day

Florida has once again shattered its single-day record for coronavirus cases, reporting 11,458 new cases of the respiratory illness on Saturday.

The Florida Department of Health has now reported a total of 190,052 confirmed coronavirus cases and 3,702 deaths, the Orlando Sentinel reported. On July 4, there were 18 new fatalities in the state.

Two weeks ago, on June 19, Florida reported 3,822 new cases of coronavirus — the highest single-day number at the time. Still, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has said that the state will not be reeling in its efforts to reopen the economy.

“We’re not going back, closing things,” he said on Wednesday. “I don’t think that that’s really what’s driving it. People going to a business is not what’s driving it. I think when you see the younger folks — I think a lot of it is more just social interactions, so that’s natural.”

EVA MARIE

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You can’t reopen Florida schools when thousands of children are infected with COVID

In a blunt and candid response delivered in the midst of a recharged coronavirus crisis sweeping through Florida, Miami-Dade’s Superintendent of Schools confessed that he can’t “guarantee” social distancing when schools open in the fall.

Of course he can’t.

Kids will be kids — and Miami-Dade’s school district is the fourth-largest in the nation.

That’s a heady combination.

Crowded halls. Crowded classrooms. Crowded cafeterias.

“Part of the [reopening] plan relies on increased social distancing, but we cannot guarantee six feet of distance,” Alberto Carvalho said during a virtual School Board meeting to vote on an opening plan for the fall that — thankfully — gives parents options.

Because the times aren’t right for a return to campus at all.

The hot summer months were supposed to bring less coronavirus infection, but the complete opposite has happened. Florida is seeing record numbers of coronavirus cases — not only in the 18-34

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Florida Keys see a daily record for COVID-19 cases and 1 new death. What happens now?

The Florida Keys on Thursday had one new COVID-19-related death and set a daily record for the number of cases reported, as the island chain braces for an influx of tourists for the long Fourth of July weekend.

The Keys reported 26 additional cases of the deadly disease, according to the Florida Department of Health, for a total of 296 cases. Five people along the island chain have died from the virus.

The person who died this week was a 67-year-old man who had “underlying chronic conditions,” according to the health department. It wasn’t immediately known where he had lived in the Keys.

On May 31, the day before the Keys took down two highway checkpoints to keep out visitors, the region had 108 known cases.

Florida also set a new daily record Thursday with 10,109 new cases. The statewide total is 169,106.

“Basically, I shudder,” said Dr. Jack Norris,

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U.S. Cases Rise Most Since May 9; Florida Surges: Virus Update

(Bloomberg) — U.S. virus cases had the biggest increase since May 9 as Florida’s infections and hospitalizations jumped by the most ever. The cornoavirus may be mutating in a way that may make it easier to spread, said Anthony Fauci, the top U.S. infectious disease researcher.

Houston reported a 4.3% jump in intensive-care patients, and may need to tap extra beds in less than two weeks. The South Africa province that includes Johannesburg and Pretoria may impose local lockdowns and alcohol curbs as cases surge.

New York City plans to reopen its public schools in September. The U.S. labor market rebound accelerated in June as broader reopenings spurred hiring, though recent virus pickups put the gains in jeopardy.

Global Tracker: Cases pass 10.7 million; Deaths top 517,000Life, liberty and face masks: a virus preys on AmericaRights of American workers could change after virusAn unfestive July 4th as states call off … Read More

Los Angeles, Florida counties to close beaches for July 4th weekend; WHO warns ‘worst is yet to come’; 126K US deaths

As coronavirus cases climbed in the U.S. and across the globe, the World Health Organization director general warned “the worst is yet to come” and European Union leaders were ready to extend the ban on American travelers for at least two more weeks.

Adjustments were being made to help slow spreading of the disease. Jacksonville, Florida, which is scheduled to host the GOP convention, is mandating masks, though it’s not clear for how long. Broadway stages will remain dark through 2020. And beaches in Los Angeles and several Florida counties will be closed for Fourth of July weekend as cases surge.

Also, a drug company’s steep price for remdesivir, a drug that has shortened recovery times for severe COVID-19 patients by about 31%, is drawing criticism.

Some good news? The nation’s leading infectious diseases expert remains “cautiously optimistic” that a vaccine could be widely available by year’s end.

Here are

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Here’s what to know in South Florida on June 28

We’re keeping track of the latest news regarding the coronavirus in South Florida and around the state.

Check back for updates on COVID-19 throughout the day.

BROWARD COUNTY PLANS TO CLOSE BEACHES FOR HOLIDAY WEEKEND

1 p.m.: Broward County will be following Miami-Dade County’s lead and closing beaches for Independence Day and the coming holiday weekend. Mayor Dale Holness told the Sun-Sentinel he will close down the beaches from Friday through Sunday and he’ll make it official Monday. Restaurants on the beach will remain open.

Holness’ announcement comes two days after Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos A. Gimenez made the same decision for the neighboring county. Florida has had more than 8,000 new cases of COVID-19 for three straight days as South Florida has once again emerged as one of the largest hotspots for the virus in the entire country.

CALCULATORS ESTIMATE HOW LONG VIRUS LIVES IN AIR, ON SURFACES

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why Republicans are set for Florida convention amid pandemic

<span>Photograph: Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images</span>
Photograph: Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

Every four years, Democrats and Republicans stage their national conventions, huge primetime events at which presidential nominations are formally bestowed amid cascades of balloons, in front of cheering crowds.

On 20 August, a little more than two months before election day, Joe Biden will duly accept the Democratic nomination in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. A week later, Donald Trump will be crowned by Republicans in Jacksonville, Florida.

Related: Trump mocks ‘basement’ strategy but prudent approach pays off for Biden

Thanks to the coronavirus pandemic, almost everything else will not proceed as usual. But the two parties will follow radically different paths.

This week, as the US death toll passed 124,000 and cases surged in many states, Democrats announced a slimmed-down convention, mostly online and with physical events staged under guidance from public health experts. Biden’s speech, for example, has been moved to a smaller venue.

Republicans have also

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