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Face Masks and Hearing Loss

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Karen Franklin has not ventured out much from her home in Yonkers, N.Y., recently—and it’s not just because of fears of COVID-19. The 65-year-old has had hearing loss for over 30 years, and even with a hearing aid in one ear and a cochlear implant in the other, she now finds it too difficult to navigate a world where everyone suddenly communicates from behind a mask, often at a great distance. 

“I was at an outdoor baby shower a few weeks ago, with everyone wearing masks and staying 6 feet apart, and I felt completely clueless,” she says. “I could not hear people clearly, and I also couldn’t lip read, which often helps me if I miss a word or two. Up until now, I’ve never felt isolated because of my hearing loss. . . . But now it’s

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Boris Johnson has a week to sort out test and trace or face ‘bleak winter’, warns shadow health secretary

Shadow health secretary Jonathan Ashworth (UK Parliament)
Shadow health secretary Jonathan Ashworth (UK Parliament)

Boris Johnson has one week to sort out the test and trace system or consign Britain to a “very bleak winter” of rising coronavirus infection and possible lockdown restrictions, Labour’s shadow health secretary Jonathan Ashworth has warned.

Although the prime minister has promised to increase testing numbers to 500,000 daily by the end of October, Mr Ashworth warned that this would not be soon enough to deal with fast-rising demand which has seen many turned away or told to travel hundreds of miles at a time when infections are doubling every week.

And he said that, rather than increasing capacity, the key decisions Mr Johnson must make now are to move the system away from the private companies which have failed to hit the required 80 per cent contact-tracing level and into the hands of local public health teams, and also to provide

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Boris Johnson has a week to sort out test and trace or face ‘bleak winter’, warns shadow health secretary

Shadow health secretary Jonathan Ashworth (UK Parliament)
Shadow health secretary Jonathan Ashworth (UK Parliament)

Boris Johnson has one week to sort out the test and trace system or consign Britain to a “very bleak winter” of rising coronavirus infection and possible lockdown restrictions, Labour’s shadow health secretary Jonathan Ashworth has warned.

Although the prime minister has promised to increase testing numbers to 500,000 daily by the end of October, Mr Ashworth warned that this would not be soon enough to deal with fast-rising demand which has seen many turned away or told to travel hundreds of miles at a time when infections are doubling every week.

And he said that, rather than increasing capacity, the key decisions Mr Johnson must make now are to move the system away from the private companies which have failed to hit the required 80 per cent contact-tracing level and into the hands of local public health teams, and also to provide

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This Viral TikTok Claims a DIY Aspirin Face Mask Can Get Rid of Acne, but Is It Legit?

Photo credit: ironstealth - Getty Images
Photo credit: ironstealth – Getty Images

From Prevention

TikTok is flooded with advice on just about everything, from kitchen hacks to fashion fixes to home decor DIYs. But one user is going viral after she posted a video using an aspirin face mask to get rid of her acne.

Mallory Le, a.k.a. @tellyourdogisayhello, says in the caption of her TikTok that an aspirin mask really helped clear up her skin. “I didn’t have to go on accutane again because of this trick,” she wrote.

In the TikTok, Le breaks down how she makes the mask. She takes two tablets of aspirin, breaks them down with a little water, and spreads the goo on her face. She then leaves it on for three minutes, before rinsing it off and patting her face dry with a towel. “Do this every few days,” she wrote, showing off her clear skin.

Plenty of people

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The Best Face Masks to Buy Online

The fashion world is stepping up in a time of need: Countless companies are now making, selling and donating non-medical grade face masks for daily protection from COVID-19.

Demand for the best face mask options has soared in recent months, in part because the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now recommends wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) masks in public settings to help slow the spread of COVID-19. PPE masks are usually made from breathable a fabric like cotton and differ from a surgical mask and N95 respirators that experts say should be reserved for health care workers who are caring for the sick.

In times of crisis, it’s heartwarming to see companies we love and support giving back using the tools and skills they know best. Nordstrom, the largest employer of tailors in the country, has trained its alterations teams to make face masks to distribute to health care

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Boris Johnson to face MPs as testing ‘failure’ puts NHS ‘under huge pressure’

Getty Images
Getty Images

Boris Johnson will face a grilling from senior MPs amid a warning that the “failure” of the test and trace system is placing “huge pressure” on the health service.

As the system struggles to cope with soaring demand, people have been turning up to accident and emergency to ask for Covid-19 tests.

Mr Johnson will face deputy Labour leader Angela Rayner for PMQs because Sir Keir Starmer remains in isolation awaiting a coronavirus test result for a member of his family.

His appearance in the Commons comes after Bolton NHS Foundation Trust said on Tuesday that a “high volume” of patients arrived to the A&E requesting tests.

Trust chair Professor Donna Hall said people in Bolton – which has the highest infection rate in England – had been trying to get tests via their GPs and the hospital when they could not get them online or at mobile

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Face masks pick perilous path from health protector to fashion accessory

<span>Photograph: Alberto Pizzoli/AFP/Getty Images</span>
Photograph: Alberto Pizzoli/AFP/Getty Images

At the Venice Film Festival the actor Tilda Swinton pulled out an ornate gold design face mask and wore it on the red carpet, just like she would have with a statement clutch bag or a must-have piece of jewellery.

The mask was not entirely pandemic-approved – on Instagram the designer James Merry said the custom-made piece was inspired by “stingray skeletons, seaweed and orchids” – but it was symbolic of a bigger shift: the world of high fashion is finally allowing itself to embrace the coronavirus face mask.

Last week also saw Lady Gaga light up the static VMA awards show with a parade of highly fashion-conscious masks. There was the bubblegum pink one from Cecilio Castrillo (a muzzle which resembled the facehugger from Alien), a horned one from Lance Victor Moore, a futuristic one designed by Smooth Technology and then when accepting an award

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30 college towns that could face economic ruin if schools don’t reopen or have to close again this fall

Classes begin for fall semester at Montana State University on August 17, 2020 in Bozeman, Montana. <p class="copyright">William Campbell/Getty Images</p>
Classes begin for fall semester at Montana State University on August 17, 2020 in Bozeman, Montana.
  • Some college students are returning to campus for their fall semester.

  • Whether universities decide to have in-person classes or a hybrid model, college towns where students usually make up a large share of the town’s population may be greatly affected.

  • Business Insider decided to look at colleges that have a large number of undergraduates to determine which towns may be most economically vulnerable during the upcoming school year.  

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Some college students across the country have already started their fall semesters, whether it be in-person or online. As some students choose to take online courses or are not interested in returning to college, this can affect the economy of towns dependent on college students.  

Many colleges closed and transitioned to remote learning in March, causing

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Sellers of false cancer cures may face criminal charges

Health minister Jo Churchill told the House of Commons this week that the government plans to act to protect the most vulnerable people from "dangerous and cruel" cancer cure propaganda.
Health minister Jo Churchill told the House of Commons this week that the government plans to act to protect the most vulnerable people from “dangerous and cruel” cancer cure propaganda.

Duty-of-care laws may be expanded to penalise individuals promoting bogus cancer treatment online, the Telegraph can reveal.

Practitioners who administer fake treatments could face criminal charges under the newly-proposed legislation 

Health minister Jo Churchill told the House of Commons this week that the government plans to act to protect the most vulnerable people from “dangerous and cruel” cancer cure propaganda.

Shadow Culture Minister Chris Matheson told MPs that he had raised the issue because he had lost a constituent in “horrendous circumstances” following bogus cancer treatments.

“The plan is to bring in new legislation as part of the Online Harms Bill,” Mr Matheson said.

“Talks have been ongoing with the health minister and I am very pleased.  

“My view is

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This teacher is going viral for discovering a genius face mask accessory

Like many teachers, Angie Madden spent the summer stocking up on school supplies, including plenty of face masks to help her make it through the school week. The Georgia resident is also heading back to the classroom with an interesting accessory that makes wearing a mask all day a bit easier: a face mask bracket.

The handy accessory rests underneath your mask and holds it in place, making it easier to talk without having to constantly adjust it. For teachers who spend their whole day talking, that’s a pretty big deal.

Last week, Madden introduced her Facebook friends to her new online find and in just a few days, the video was shared nearly 300,000 times.

Madden put the product to the test when she made her way back to the classroom in August — and so far, she’s loving it.

“We started school 10 days ago and it has

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