COVID19

After COVID-19, China moves to kick its exotic meat habit

Ou Yang is having a hard time finding snake to eat.

“A very famous restaurant specialized in cooking snakes in my city already stopped providing such dishes,” Ou told NBC News from Foshan, in southern China, where snake has long been regarded as a delicacy. “They are all banned now.”

As the world struggles to contain the coronavirus pandemic, China is clamping down on the sale of wildlife for human consumption amid concerns about another outbreak of a zoonotic disease. What began as a temporary ban to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 is making legislative leaps to a broader ban on the practice — a move international public health and wildlife experts have been urging for years.

While it means Ou will have to forgo his dinners of snakes, crocodiles, boars and bamboo rats, he understands the reasoning.

“I think the ban is helpful to maintain public health safety,” he

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Colleges race to create ‘a new sense of normalcy.’ Will new rules, COVID-19 testing be enough?

SAN DIEGO – When students arrive at the University of California-San Diego in August, they will find coronavirus testing stations strategically planted throughout campus.

To determine whether they’ve been infected, they’ll take a swab, dab it with nasal slime and leave the sample in a collection box. Bar codes with the packets will be linked to their personal medical records and cellphone numbers.

Within a day, students can expect results via text message. For those who test positive, a huge response system includes medical care, isolation and contact tracing.

Robert Schooley, chief of the infectious diseases division at UC San Diego Health, said the reopening plan, dubbed Return to Learn, has multiple scenarios for campus life, and surveillance results will dictate which one administrators deploy. Researchers will even pull manhole covers to check campus sewage for coronavirus levels.

“We want to be able to adjust what we do to what

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Keeping COVID-19 outside of camps is a near impossible challenge

As summer camps across the country debated whether and how to operate during the coronavirus pandemic this spring, Kanakuk Kamps, a prominent network of Christian sports camps in Missouri, announced its five overnight camps would open to over 20,000 kids starting May 30.

“Our full-time summer staff of 1,600 qualified individuals including 100 registered nurses and 60 volunteer doctors are hired and sitting on ready,” Joe White, who runs the camp with his wife Debbie-Jo, told families. “We are planning on being open all summer.”

On their website the camp assured parents “We are focused on taking all reasonable measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in our Kamps.”

But now even cautious hopes that COVID-19 might be kept outside Kanakuk Kamps’ gates are already dashed. On July 1, parents were notified by email that one of the camps, known as K-2, was shutting down. The Stone County Health Department’

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Colleges are racing to create ‘a new sense of normalcy.’ Will new rules, COVID-19 testing be enough?

SAN DIEGO — When students arrive at the University of California San Diego in August, they will find coronavirus testing stations strategically planted throughout campus.

To determine if they’ve been infected, they’ll take a swab, dab it with nasal slime and leave the sample in a collection box. Bar codes with the packets will be linked to their personal medical records and cell phone numbers.

Within a day, students can expect results via text message. For those who test positive, it will set in motion a huge response system that includes medical care, isolation and contact tracing.

Robert Schooley, chief of the infectious diseases division at UC San Diego Health, said the reopening plan, dubbed Return to Learn, has multiple scenarios for campus life and surveillance results will dictate which one administrators deploy. Researchers will even pull manhole covers to check campus sewage for coronavirus levels.

“We want to be

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California severely short on firefighting crews after COVID-19 lockdown at prison camps

As California enters another dangerous fire season following a dry winter, the COVID-19 pandemic is depleting the ranks of inmate fire crews that are a key component of the state’s efforts to battle out-of-control wildfires

This week, state prison officials announced they had placed 12 of the state’s 43 inmate fire camps on lockdown due to a massive outbreak at a Northern California prison in Lassen County that serves as the training center for fire crews.

Until the lockdown lifts, only 30 of the 77 inmate crews are available to fight a wildfire in the north state, prison officials said.

California’s incarcerated firefighters have for decades been the state’s primary firefighting “hand crews,” and the shortage has California officials scrambling to come up with replacement firefighters in a dry season that is shaping up to be among the most extreme in years. The state’s hunting for bulldozer crews and enlisting

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Texas Doctor Forced to Choose Which COVID-19 Patients Get Beds as Hospital Is Overwhelmed with Cases

As the number of coronavirus cases in the U.S. continues to rise, a doctor in San Antonio, Texas, has been forced to make the difficult decision of choosing which of the patients currently fighting for their lives get to be placed in hospital beds.

Dr. Jeffrey DellaVolpe, a pulmonologist and the director of the ECMO program at San Antonio Methodist Hospital told CNN that this explosion of cases is not something he and other healthcare professionals were at all prepared for.

“Yesterday was probably the worst day I ever had,” DellaVolpe said. “I got 10 calls. Young people who would otherwise be excellent candidates to be able to put on ECMO.”

ECMO (Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation), is a therapy that adds oxygen to one’s blood and pumps it through their body.

“They’re so sick that if they don’t get put on, if they don’t get the support, they are going to

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More Than 100 Students in Greek System at University Of Washington Positive for COVID-19

Over 100 students in the University of Washington’s Greek system have reported testing positive for the coronavirus this week, amplifying concern about the reopening of colleges and universities this fall.

According to CBS News, 105 students living in 15 fraternity houses near campus this summer reported testing positive for the virus on Thursday. The county health department has verified 62 of those cases, as well as four other students who were in close contact with the residents but do not live there.

As the university continues to confirm these cases, residents are being asked to quarantine or self-isolate for the time being. None of the residents have been hospitalized.

UW did not immediately respond to PEOPLE’s request for comment.

RELATED: Roughly 300 Teens Exposed to Coronavirus After Attending ‘Pong Fest’ Party in Texas Town, Confirms Mayor

The first cluster was reported Tuesday, with the university sharing that at least 38

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Critics say federal agency is where workplace COVID-19 complaints go to die

The complaints have poured in from Florida work sites since the start of the pandemic.

From a Miami prison where staff allegedly weren’t provided proper protective equipment. From a whistleblower at a Panhandle plasma donation center where employees who were visibly sick and awaiting COVID-19 test results allegedly still came into work. From a hospital where nurses treating a patient allegedly weren’t told the patient was COVID-positive.

The complaints go to the federal Occupational Health and Safety Administration, which dutifully maintains a list of the alleged infractions. But it’s unclear how much action is being taken.

OSHA, charged with enforcing health and safety in the American workplace, has received more than 6,000 complaints nationwide about unsafe work conditions related to COVID-19. And yet, on June 9, Labor Secretary Eugene Scalia told lawmakers that OSHA, which his department oversees, had issued just one citation related to the coronavirus — to a

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Florida Keys see a daily record for COVID-19 cases and 1 new death. What happens now?

The Florida Keys on Thursday had one new COVID-19-related death and set a daily record for the number of cases reported, as the island chain braces for an influx of tourists for the long Fourth of July weekend.

The Keys reported 26 additional cases of the deadly disease, according to the Florida Department of Health, for a total of 296 cases. Five people along the island chain have died from the virus.

The person who died this week was a 67-year-old man who had “underlying chronic conditions,” according to the health department. It wasn’t immediately known where he had lived in the Keys.

On May 31, the day before the Keys took down two highway checkpoints to keep out visitors, the region had 108 known cases.

Florida also set a new daily record Thursday with 10,109 new cases. The statewide total is 169,106.

“Basically, I shudder,” said Dr. Jack Norris,

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B.C. premier concerned about Americans stopping in the province, 87 per cent of COVID-19 cases in Ontario have recovered

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 102,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and more than 8,500 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

July 2

6:50 p.m.: Three flights to Vancouver flagged for possible COVID-19 exposure

The B.C. Centre for Disease Control is

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