COVID

Beloit student body penned its campus Covid rules. Now they’re enforcing them.

At one Wisconsin college, students wrote the Covid-19 rules — and they’re enforcing them.

While most universities faced with an explosion of new coronavirus cases gave that job to administrators, Beloit College enlisted 20 students to write up a set of guidelines for navigating life on campus during a pandemic that they’ve dubbed “Behavioral Expectations.”

Rather than simply banning all events and other social gatherings, or shutting down the fraternities and sororities like many schools faced with campus Covid-19 outbreaks did, the Beloit rules recognize that students will be students.

“Faculty and administration do not experience campus life the same way students do, and with COVID-19, we realized students needed to help redefine expectations of campus,” junior Saad Ahsan, the Beloit student government co-president, said in an emailed response to NBC News. “We felt it was important to add behavioral guidelines to reflect the values of the Beloit student body.”

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Beloit student body penned their campus Covid rules. Now they’re enforcing them.

At one Wisconsin college, students wrote the Covid-19 rules — and they’re enforcing them.

While most universities faced with an explosion of new coronavirus cases gave that job to administrators, Beloit College enlisted 20 students to write up a set of guidelines for navigating life on campus during a pandemic that they’ve dubbed “Behavioral Expectations.”

Rather than simply banning all events and other social gatherings, or shutting down the fraternities and sororities like many schools faced with campus Covid-19 outbreaks did, the Beloit rules recognize that students will be students.

“Faculty and administration do not experience campus life the same way students do, and with COVID-19, we realized students needed to help redefine expectations of campus,” junior Saad Ahsan, the Beloit student government co-president, said in an emailed response to NBC News. “We felt it was important to add behavioral guidelines to reflect the values of the Beloit student body.”

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What STDs Can Tell Us About How To Fight Covid

As Covid-19 has rampaged across the United States, government officials have struggled with the basic steps needed to contain the pandemic. Should everyone get tested, or just people with symptoms? Should public health officials require Americans to wear masks or not? What’s the best way to track the infection, particularly in marginalized communities?

For one set of public health experts, the heated debates over testing, wearing masks and contact tracing were eerily familiar — as odd as it might seem, these are similar to arguments that officials and academics working to eradicate sexually transmitted diseases have been having for decades as they’ve worked to bring down the rates of infections like HIV, syphilis, gonorrhea and chlamydia.

It may seem incongruous — even inappropriate — to compare a respiratory disease to a sexually transmitted infection. After all, it’s emotionally harder (if logistically easier) for someone to tell a contact tracer who

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Violence mounts against Iraqi doctors as COVID cases spike

By Amina Ismail

NAJAF, Iraq (Reuters) – Iraqi doctor Tariq Al-Sheibani remembers little else beyond cowering on the ground as a dozen relatives of a patient, who had just died of COVID-19, beat him unconscious.

About two hours later the 47-year-old director of Al-Amal Hospital in the southern city of Najaf woke up in a different clinic with bruises all over his body.

“All the doctors are scared,” said Sheibani, speaking at his home in Kufa a few weeks after the Aug. 28 attack. “Every time a patient dies, we all hold our breath.”

He is one of many doctors struggling to do their job as COVID-19 cases rise sharply in Iraq.

They are working within a health service that has been left to decay through years of civil conflict and underfunding, and now face the added threat of physical attack by grieving and desperate families.

Reuters spoke to seven

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California parents struggle as Covid and fires collide

With much of northern California still under lockdown and wildfires raging across the state, Corinne Perham’s nine-year-old daughter recently asked: can coronavirus and fire make people extinct?

Covid-19 changed the lives of Perham’s family in ways large and small – her husband, an emergency room doctor, started showering before he came home from work, and her nine- and 10-year-old daughters were distance learning at their Chico home. Then a deadly wildfire burning nearby rained ash on the region and created hazardous air that meant no one could go outside for days. Perham’s kids started asking “when will the fires be over?” along with “when will corona be over?”

Related: ‘We need to show children we can survive’: how to parent through a pandemic

“The children of Chico are so resilient,” Perham, 44, told the Guardian told this week, adding that her daughters were familiar with the sight of smoke because

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Miami-Dade’s first COVID budget passed without much pain. The problem: Next year

With sales taxes plunging, a hotel industry ravaged and nightclubs closed by emergency law, Miami-Dade commissioners passed a $9 billion budget Thursday night that expands county hiring, preserves services and keeps property tax rates flat.

Before their votes during the online meeting, commissioners warned not to expect such an easy time for next year’s spending plan.

“Those of who stay here are going to face a lot of problems in the future budgets,” said Commissioner Rebeca Sosa, one of six commissioners assured seats in 2021 on the 13-seat board, which is facing historic churn this fall from term limits.

“I am very concerned about next year,” said Commissioner Jose “Pepe” Diaz, who, like Sosa, doesn’t have to leave his seat until 2022. “Nobody is giving a happy face to next year’s budget… We need to continue to tighten the belt.“

It was also the final budget proposed by Mayor Carlos

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10 States Where COVID Cases are Skyrocketing

With coronavirus outbreaks happening in schools, at weddings and in bars, you must be wondering if you are well and truly safe in your state. The truth is we all must be careful, but some states are currently affected more than others. Here are the states with test positivity above 10% as of this week, according to Reuters. Read on, and to ensure your health and the health of others, don’t miss these Sure Signs You’ve Already Had Coronavirus.

South Dakota Welcome sign
South Dakota Welcome sign

18.9% Test Positivity Rate

“The number of South Dakotans hospitalized after being infected with coronavirus jumped 21% between Monday and Tuesday, the South Dakota Department of Health reported Tuesday,” reports the Argus Leader. “The 133 people hospitalized Tuesday represented 6% of the state’s total hospital capacity and 8% of intensive care beds. It was the largest number of people hospitalized in the state with

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Fire and COVID rage all around me. Can’t we do better?

This has been anything but a normal year, but when I first saw the lightning strikes, I thought, even for 2020, this is crazy. Waking me from sleep in my San Francisco home, forks of lightning lit up the pitch-black sky at a terrifying frequency and with deafening roars. It was beautiful. It was ominous. In all, there were almost 7,000 lightning strikes on that mid-August day, streaking across the urban landscape.

The following morning, we joked of the coming apocalypse, but little did we imagine that two weeks later we would literally find ourselves in a fiery, hellish landscape, obscuring the beauty of California behind smoke and fire, and leaving millions of people struggling with the health consequences of breathing these toxic fumes. 

Coupled with climate change, heat waves and forest overgrowth, the lightning storms were the catalyst to the worst wildfire season the West Coast has seen in

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heart-wrenching accounts of ordinary lives in the time of Covid

In the workroom of Suzanna and Florence Sweryda, photographed by Alun Callender - Alun Callender
In the workroom of Suzanna and Florence Sweryda, photographed by Alun Callender – Alun Callender

Brace yourself. Grab some tissues. Because today the National Portrait Gallery launches Hold Still, an online exhibition featuring 100 photographs taken by ordinary people during lockdown. And, while some are predictable, many are not: they pierce straight through.

The idea came from the gallery’s patron, the Duchess of Cambridge, who knows a thing or two about photography. Back in May, she invited the public to contribute to an open-call “community project”, recording everyday life amid the pandemic: hold still, Britain, while we take a photographic portrait of the nation. Of course, this came at a time when all of us, at the government’s behest, were “holding still”.

Though Kate did offer some guidance, suggesting a few themes, the ambition was to be inclusive, not prescriptive – and, over six weeks, more than 31,000 photographs were

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College Campuses Make Up 19 Of The 25 Worst COVID Outbreaks In U.S.

A new analysis of data finds 19 of the 25 hottest coronavirus outbreaks are occurring in college towns

The topic of whether or not to bring college students back for in-person classes has been heated for several months due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Over the summer, as cases peaked in many areas of the country, many schools opted against welcoming students back to campus for the 2020-2021 academic year. However, in early August, many universities around the country did reopen and in the last several weeks there have been numerous large outbreaks across the country linked to these schools, and students have even been suspended for engaging in risky coronavirus behavior. And, even scarier, according to a new analysis of data, the majority of the large coronavirus outbreaks in the country are centralized in college towns.

USA Today analyzed data from Johns Hopkins University, finding that of the 25 hottest

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