Chinese

USC Professor Placed on Leave after Black Students Complained His Pronunciation of a Chinese Word Affected Their Mental Health

The University of Southern California has placed a communications professor on leave after a group of black MBA candidates threatened to drop his class rather than “endure the emotional exhaustion of carrying on with an instructor that disregards cultural diversity and sensitivities” following the instructor’s use of a Chinese word that sounds like a racial slur while teaching.

Greg Patton, a professor at the university’s Marshall School of Business, was giving a lecture about the use of “filler words” in speech during a recent online class when he used the word in question, saying, “If you have a lot of ‘ums and errs,’ this is culturally specific, so based on your native language. Like in China, the common word is ‘that, that, that.’ So in China it might be ‘nèi ge, nèi ge, nèi ge.’”

In an August 21 email to university administration obtained by National Review, students accused

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Fugitive Chinese researcher arrested overnight, being held in Sacramento County Jail

The Chinese researcher who fled her post as a visiting researcher at UC Davis after being questioned by the FBI has emerged from the Chinese consulate in San Francisco and is in custody at the Sacramento County Main Jail, online jail records show.

Juan Tang, 37, who had been a visiting cancer researcher at UC Davis for several months, left her Davis apartment in June after FBI agents questioned her about evidence that she lied concerning whether she was a member of the Chinese military or Communist Party when she applied for a visa, according to federal court papers.

She is one of four Chinese researchers charged by federal authorities in recent days with lying about their background to gain access to the United States, and the Justice Department issued a statement Thursday saying Tang “is a fugitive from justice currently being harbored at the Chinese Consulate in San Francisco.”

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Chinese Beauty Industry Experts Defend Whitening Products

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LONDON — Major beauty brands are changing how they describe whitening and lightening skin-care products, but is that what the consumer wants in China, the category’s largest Asian market?

“I will still buy ‘whitening’ or ‘brightening’ products because I prefer looking fairer and I don’t like the way I look when I am tanned. It has nothing to do with me wanting to assimilate to the Western ideal of beauty, wealth and social status, it’s just my personal preference,” said Fiona Liu, a product designer in Shanghai. She is also an amateur beauty vlogger who spends a good amount of her salary on skin-care products.

“Reading about what brands are doing to not seem racist makes me want to roll my eyes. While I sympathize with women in South Asia and Africa, or women from minority backgrounds in Europe and North America using

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Exotic meats are a Chinese delicacy. But they’re causing concern about another outbreak.

Ou Yang is having a hard time finding snake to eat.

“A very famous restaurant specialized in cooking snakes in my city already stopped providing such dishes,” Ou told NBC News from Foshan, in southern China, where snake has long been regarded as a delicacy. “They are all banned now.”

As the world struggles to contain the coronavirus pandemic, China is clamping down on the sale of wildlife for human consumption amid concerns about another outbreak of a zoonotic disease. What began as a temporary ban to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 is making legislative leaps to a broader ban on the practice — a move international public health and wildlife experts have been urging for years.

While it means Ou will have to forgo his dinners of snakes, crocodiles, boars and bamboo rats, he understands the reasoning.

“I think the ban is helpful to maintain public health safety,” he

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