California

California Assembly Bill 5 is hurting freelance workers, job market

  • California’s Assembly 5 law aimed to help freelancers across the state.
  • The intent was to get companies to reclassifying more independent contractors as employees in an effort to help people gain access to benefits like healthcare.
  • However, it backfired as companies instead dropped these positions and got rid of the availability of freelance work.
  • The bill needs reform as soon as possible.
  • Kevin Falconer is the mayor of San Diego.
  • This is an opinion column. The thoughts expressed are those of the author.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

California is where bold ideas are born, new trends are set, and anyone can make it big. But as a lifelong Californian and the mayor of the state’s second largest city, San Diego, I see every day how it is getting harder for people to get ahead and earn a decent living here.

This is why I’m urging continued reform

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Drubbed in 2018, California GOP looks to regain House seats

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FILE – In this Jan. 17, 2019, file photo, Rep. T.J. Cox, D-Calif., of California’s 21st Congressional district, speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Cox is facing a challenge from David Valadao, the incumbent he defeated in 2018. California’s tarnished Republican Party is hoping to rebound in a handful of U.S. House races but its candidates must overcome widespread loathing for President Donald Trump and voting trends that have made the nation’s most populous state an exemplar of Democratic strength.

AP

California’s tarnished Republican Party is hoping to rebound in a handful of U.S. House races but its candidates must overcome widespread loathing for President Donald Trump and voting trends that have made the nation’s most populous state an exemplar of Democratic strength.

The presidential contest is essentially over in California — Trump lost by more than 4 million votes to Hillary

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Ex-presidential contender Andrew Yang takes lead in California data privacy measure

The Fitbits on our wrists collect our health and fitness data; Apple promises privacy but lots of iPhone apps can still share our personal information; and who really knows what they’re agreeing to when a website asks, “Do You Accept All Cookies?” Most people just click “OK” and hope for the best, says former Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang.

“The amount of data we’re giving up is unprecedented in human history,” says Yang, who lives in New York but is helping lead the campaign for a data privacy initiative on California’s Nov. 3 ballot. “Don’t you think it’s time we did something about it?”

Yang is chairing the advisory board for Proposition 24, which he and other supporters see as a model for other states as the U.S. tries to catch up with protections that already exist

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Andrew Yang takes lead in California data privacy measure

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The Fitbits on our wrists collect our health and fitness data; Apple promises privacy but lots…

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The Fitbits on our wrists collect our health and fitness data; Apple promises privacy but lots of iPhone apps can still share our personal information; and who really knows what they’re agreeing to when a website asks, “Do You Accept All Cookies?” Most people just click “OK” and hope for the best, says former Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang.

“The amount of data we’re giving up is unprecedented in human history,” says Yang, who lives in New York but is helping lead the campaign for a data privacy initiative on California’s Nov. 3 ballot. “Don’t you think it’s time we did something about it?”

Yang is chairing the advisory board for Proposition 24, which he and other supporters see as a model for other states as

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California governor signs corporate boardroom diversity law

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FILE – In this Sept. 13, 2017, file photo, Assemblyman Chris Holden, D-Pasadena, watches as the votes are posted for a measure at the Assembly in Sacramento, Calif. Hundreds of California-based corporations must have directors from racial or sexual minorities on their boards under a first-in-the-nation bill signed Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2020, by Gov. Gavin Newsom, that Holden authored.

AP

Hundreds of California-based corporations must have directors from racial or sexual minorities on their boards under a first-in-the-nation bill signed Wednesday by Gov. Gavin Newsom.

The diversity legislation is similar to a 2018 measure that required boardrooms to have at least one female director by 2019. Like that measure, it could face court challenges from conservative groups who view it as a discriminatory quota.

Supporters evoked both the coronavirus pandemic that is disproportionately affecting minorities and weeks of unrest and calls for inclusion that followed the

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New California law lets nurses work independently of doctors

Gov. Gavin Newsom paved the way for nurse practitioners in California to practice medicine independent of doctors under a bill he signed Tuesday.

Newsom’s signature represents the culmination of a fight that has spanned several legislative sessions, pitting doctors groups against those that want to expand nurse practitioners’ ability to treat patients.

The measure, Assembly Bill 890, would allow nurse practitioners to practice independently in 2023. Nurse practitioners would have to operate under a doctor’s supervision for a minimum three-year transition period before embarking on their own practices. Current California law requires nurse practitioners, who hold masters or doctorate degrees in nursing and additional certification beyond a regular nursing degree, to always operate under a doctor’s supervision.

When it takes effect in 2021, the new law will direct the Board of Registered Nursing to establish a commission to oversee implementation and requirements. Nurse practitioners must notify patients that they are

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California hospital forced to evacuate in Glass Fire

The Glass Fire in Napa County, California, forced thousands of evacuations, including 55 patients at a local hospital, CNN reported.

During a pandemic, this is an especially serious decision to make. So what does it take for officials to make that call?

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality offers a guide on when hospitals should evacuate and how to do it safely.

“Building integrity, critical infrastructure, and other environmental factors must be assessed to determine whether the hospital can continue to provide appropriate medical care to patients or should instead be evacuated,” the agency’s website states.

If the hospital building is not damaged, officials must then move to assessing patient and staff safety. In the case of the Glass Fire, officials at the Adventist Health St. Helena hospital made the decision to evacuate before the fire could do any structural damage, according to KGO.

“The last one was eight

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Fresno State president named chancellor of California State University

A Hanford native who led Fresno State for seven years will be the first Mexican-American chancellor of the California State University system.

The appointment of Joseph I. Castro to head the 23-campus university system — the largest in the United States — was announced early Wednesday in a statement to students and the communities.

“It is with mixed feelings that I share the news today of my appointment by the California State University Board of Trustees as the eighth chancellor of the CSU, effective Jan. 4, 2021,” he said via email.

Castro, 53, will replace Chancellor Timothy P. White, a Fresno State alum, who announced his retirement last year after serving since 2012.

When Castro takes the CSU system’s helm in early 2021, an interim president will take his place at Fresno State, he said. A search for a successor will begin around the same time.

“I would just like

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California parents struggle as Covid and fires collide

With much of northern California still under lockdown and wildfires raging across the state, Corinne Perham’s nine-year-old daughter recently asked: can coronavirus and fire make people extinct?

Covid-19 changed the lives of Perham’s family in ways large and small – her husband, an emergency room doctor, started showering before he came home from work, and her nine- and 10-year-old daughters were distance learning at their Chico home. Then a deadly wildfire burning nearby rained ash on the region and created hazardous air that meant no one could go outside for days. Perham’s kids started asking “when will the fires be over?” along with “when will corona be over?”

Related: ‘We need to show children we can survive’: how to parent through a pandemic

“The children of Chico are so resilient,” Perham, 44, told the Guardian told this week, adding that her daughters were familiar with the sight of smoke because

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how a conspiratorial hate campaign upended California politics

<span>Photograph: Christian Monterrosa/EPA</span>
Photograph: Christian Monterrosa/EPA

Catie Stewart was on her way home from a vacation in early August when her phone reconnected to cell service and she realized something was wrong. As the communications director for Scott Wiener, a California state senator, Stewart manages her boss’s Instagram account, a task that usually involves responding to a handful of messages each day. But while Stewart had been out of cellphone range, a bill authored by Wiener had become the target of a misinformation and harassment campaign by activists who oppose coronavirus public health measures and followers of the QAnon conspiracy theory.

“FUCKING FILTH. BLOW YOUR HEAD OFF,” read one representative message that accused Wiener of “creating a law to allow pedophiles to be charged on a lesser degree”. Others fantasized about dragging Wiener’s body behind a car until he died, accused him of worshipping “Moloch”, or declared an intention to find and kill

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