businesses

Businesses pivot to meet the demand for COVID-19 disinfection

MILWAUKEE – As more people are allowed back into offices, restaurants and hotels under the City of Milwaukee’s re-opening plans, the need for disinfection is greater than ever.

Pest 2 Rest Pest Control, a family-owned extermination company, is one of the many businesses that now specialize in COVID-19 disinfection.

“There is a 0.1% difference between sanitizing and disinfecting,” said Jeffery Hardy Sr., the co-owner of Pest 2 Rest. “So, sanitizing, you’re cleaning; disinfecting, you’re killing the virus. And that’s what we’re encouraging people to do.”

He also encourages clients to have a plan of action after his job is done.

Hardy’s business, as its name would suggest, started out killing bed bugs, roaches, rodents and other critters. Since March, Hardy chose to pivot like many other entrepreneurs. Now, he and his wife, Brenda, and sometimes their three kids as well, spray interiors to rid keyboards, desks and doorknobs of the

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Target, McDonald’s, Old Navy now require face masks amid COVID-19. See the full list of businesses requiring them.

The nation’s largest retailers are now requiring what some states and cities won’t: the use of face masks.

Walmart, Target, CVS, Walgreens and Kroger are the biggest to announce  mask mandates at stores nationwide joining the list of businesses with face covering requirements growing as COVID-19 cases rise. The coronavirus causes the disease COVID-19.

Dozens and dozens of states now require masks in public places, with Alabama, Arkansas and Colorado recently adding mandates. One state went in the opposite direction this week when Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp suspended all local government mask orders on July 15.  

Individual businesses can choose to institute further restrictions, and the National Retail Federation is encouraging retailers to set nationwide mask policies to protect shoppers and employees.

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Retailers requiring masks isn’t new – especially in areas with local orders

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3 New York City businesses on what it’s been like reopening in the first U.S. epicenter of the pandemic

Subscribe to How To Reopen, our weekly newsletter on what it takes to reboot business in the midst of a pandemic.

New York City quickly became the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States this past spring. As the novel coronavirus has spread rapidly elsewhere nationwide, New York has been able to bring cases down and began to reopen businesses this summer, making it a possible blueprint for other American cities once they have the virus under control.

Anyone who has ventured out to a store or small business that is not a grocery store or a pharmacy (which are also quite different than they used to be but remained open during the shutdown) knows that retail experiences and services are not like what they once were. There are a lot of new rules put in place to keep customers and employees safe, which might look very different

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How Food Businesses Nationwide Are Responding

These are unprecedented times. It seems like the whole world has been brought to its knees, from the rapid and destructive spread of COVID-19 to the protests in response to police brutality and the murders of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd. The food industry isn’t exempt. So as things develop, we’ve asked people working in the food industry, from coast to coast, to share what they’re seeing in their communities, how they’ve been affected, and how they’re responding.

Wednesday, July 22

“As a restaurant owner, you lose in any direction you take. You lose if you stay closed, you lose if you stay open.”

Nina Compton, Compère Lapin and Bywater American Bistro, New Orleans: They closed the bars again here last week. Restaurants can still operate at 50 percent capacity—right now Compère Lapin is closed and Bywater American Bistro is operating at 50 percent—but we’re living week

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366,000 Californians infected, shutdowns ravage local businesses

It was another troubling week in California, as growing infections and hospitalizations prompted state and local officials to announce new widespread closures of businesses and schools across the state to slow the coronavirus pandemic.

The pandemic, which is disproportionately ravaging communities of color, has killed at least 7,475 Californians. This week alone, more than 45,000 Californians were reported to have tested positive for the coronavirus, according to state data released Friday morning, bringing the total number of infections in the state to more than 366,000.

More than 6,800 Californians with the virus are currently in a hospital bed, according to the state. About 28 percent of hospitalized patients are in intensive care. There were 44 more COVID-19 patients in intensive care on Thursday compared to the previous day.

“This continues to be a deadly disease,” California Gov. Gavin Newsom said during his noon press conference Monday. “This continues to be

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356,000 Californians infected, shutdowns ravage local businesses

It was another troubling week in California, as growing infections and hospitalizations prompted state and local officials to announce new widespread closures of businesses and schools across the state to slow the coronavirus pandemic.

The pandemic, which is disproportionately ravaging communities of color, has killed at least 7,345 Californians. This week alone, more than 35,000 Californians were reported to have tested positive for the coronavirus, according to state data released Thursday morning, bringing the total number of infections in the state to about 356,000.

Nearly 6,800 Californians with the virus are currently in a hospital bed, according to the state. About 28 percent of hospitalized patients are in intensive care. There were nine fewer COVID-19 patients in hospital beds on Wednesday compared to the previous day.

“This continues to be a deadly disease,” California Gov. Gavin Newsom said during his noon press conference Monday. “This continues to be a disease

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How To Support Black Owned Businesses In Waltham

WALTHAM, MA — Amid civil rights demonstrations sparked by the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, many are left wondering how they can help causes of racial equality and support the Black and Brown communities. At Black Lives Matter rallies across Greater Boston area speakers are encouraging participants and allies to support Black-owned businesses.

But what does that mean in Waltham?

There are more than 1,000 black-owned businesses across the state and Black Economic Council of Massachusetts Executive Director Segun Idowu said a good start is to frequent those, including at least a dozen in Waltham.

“It’s a critical moment because people are looking beyond police brutality and seeing it for what it is: a systemic issue,” Idowu said.

That systemic issue is connected to the economy, he said.

Previous Black Lives Matter protests seemed to focus on policing, but today in the context of COVID, it has laid bare

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Here’s how small businesses threatened by COVID-19 are surviving the pandemic

With the unemployment rate at 11.1% and businesses shut down in every state, COVID-19 has taken a crippling toll on America’s economic health.

MORE: Small businesses rethink their approach amid the pandemic to serve their customers

For many small businesses, which comprise 47% of private-sector payrolls in the U.S., according to the Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council, the sudden economic downturn has created a full-blown crisis.

MORE: When coronavirus hit, these small businesses got creative, but they still need help

The big-picture concern shared by economists is if businesses don’t survive, many Americans won’t have jobs to return to after the pandemic. That’s why experts have said it’s important to support local businesses, which are struggling to generate reliable income.

Now, salons, restaurants, florists and fitness instructors, among others, are creatively adjusting to the new realities of the coronavirus economy, pivoting to bringing parts of their business online, connecting with

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Black-Owned Health and Wellness Businesses to Support Now and Always

As the country is still grappling with the tragic death of George Floyd and the ongoing protests in its wake, musician and activist Calvin Martyr has launched #BlackOutDay2020 on July 7. This campaign calls for an economic boycott where the Black community pauses on buying to highlight their economic spending power. If they do spend money, they are encouraged to buy from Black-owned businesses only.

Just like the fashion and beauty industries, the wellness and health space is full of brands that are founded and run by Black women and men. Whether they’re selling aromatherapy candles, producing fitness-minded podcasts or shattering stigmas of what it means to be “well” for Black women, each of these companies was once just a dream and is now a hard-earned reality.

But don’t just shop these Black-owned businesses today, or this week. Support them regularly, engage with them on social media and spread the

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Leicester residents express fears for their businesses as lockdown extended

Samuel Lovett
Samuel Lovett

George Neal, the owner of four hair salons across Leicester, believed his business could survive the coronavirus pandemic – if he was able to reopen in early July. But now a second lockdown has begun, his hopes of survival are fading.

“I’ve been saying that the beginning of July is it,” he tells The Independent. “Any longer than that and I don’t know if we can survive.”

His business is one of many that, after preparing for the reopening of trade on 4 July, is now facing fresh uncertainty and financial hardship as authorities attempt to grapple with a localised outbreak that has seen 944 cases recorded within the city over the past two weeks.

As the rest of the country moves to take a welcome but tentative step out of lockdown, there is to be no such relief for the 330,000 or so residents of Leicester.

Here,

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