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Big Ten schools to only play conference games; CDC won’t rewrite school guidelines; Florida sees record death total

Florida saw an alarming increase in deaths and top federal health officials ran counter to President Donald Trump’s wishes, saying guidelines for reopening schools won’t be rewritten and some states should consider shutting down again as coronavirus cases spike nationwide Thursday.

The Big Ten announced it will limit its fall sports to only conference games, impacting several significant scheduled football games. The ACC pushed the start of its season back to Sept. 1.

Florida reported 120 deaths – almost 50% more than the previous one-day high of 83 in late April – as the state surpassed 4,000 deaths. Nationwide, the Johns Hopkins data dashboard reported a one-day total of 820 U.S. deaths and a near-record 58,601 new cases.

“Any state that is having a serious problem, that state should seriously look at shutting down,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said on “The

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Teachers weigh risks of COVID-19

Christy Karwatt teaches social studies, but she’s been thinking more like a math teacher the past few days.

At 61, the Sarasota High School teacher is entering her 27th year in Florida’s system, and she loves her job. She had planned on teaching three more years to maximize her retirement payment. 

As COVID-19 cases spike across the country, officials pour on pressure to reopen schools full-time this fall.

Monday, Florida’s education commissioner ordered the state’s schools to open full-time in August. Tuesday, U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos criticized plans to offer in-person instruction only a few days a week. And the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is reworking its guidance on reopening schools after President Donald Trump said the guidelines were too tough. 

Early guidance from health experts: Scheduled days home, more online learning, lots of hand-washing

Karwatt began crunching the numbers on how much money she would sacrifice

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Fetal coronavirus infection is possible, small study suggests

A small study strengthens evidence that a pregnant woman infected with the coronavirus might be able to spread it to her fetus.

Researchers from Italy said Thursday that they studied 31 women with COVID-19 who delivered babies in March and April. They found signs of the virus in several samples of umbilical cord blood, the placenta and, in one case, breast milk.

Full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak

Women shouldn’t panic. This doesn’t mean there’s viable virus in those places and “it’s too early to make guidelines” or to change care, said the study leader, Dr. Claudio Fenizia, an immunology specialist at the University of Milan.

Related: Of the 33 pregnant women studied, three later had babies with confirmed cases of the coronavirus. The babies all recovered well.

But it does merit more study, especially of women who are infected earlier in their pregnancies than these women, said Fenizia, who

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Ontario urges parents to be prepared for every school scenario, mulls Stage 3 reopening

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 106,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and more than 8,700 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

July 9

1:50 p.m.: Ontario education minister still asking parent to prepare for three different schooling options for September

After

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Study suggests fetal coronavirus infection is possible

A small study strengthens evidence that a pregnant woman infected with the coronavirus might be able to spread it to her fetus.

Researchers from Italy said Thursday that they studied 31 women with COVID-19 who delivered babies in March and April. They found signs of the virus in several samples of umbilical cord blood, the placenta and, in one case, breast milk.

Women shouldn’t panic. This doesn’t mean there’s viable virus in those places and “it’s too early to make guidelines” or to change care, said the study leader, Dr. Claudio Fenizia, an immunology specialist at the University of Milan.

But it does merit more study, especially of women who are infected earlier in their pregnancies than these women, said Fenizia, who discussed the results at a medical conference being held online because of the pandemic.

Since the start of the pandemic, doctors have wondered whether in-the-womb infection could occur.

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How to Sew Comfortable and Protective Face Masks at Home

From Good Housekeeping

As more information about the coronavirus pandemic develops, some of the information in this story may have changed since it was last updated. For the most up-to-date information on COVID-19, please visit the online resources provided by the CDC, WHO, and your local public health department.

Making a DIY face mask has become the top stay-home activity during the novel coronavirus outbreak – whether it’s for your own personal use or to donate to healthcare facilities. The CDC recommends wearing a face covering any time you go out in public, and several state and local governments are now requiring it as COVID-19 cases continue to rise. On top of that, medical face masks for healthcare workers have been running low due to high demand for personal protective equipment (PPE).

Hospitals are asking for donations of N-95 respirators (the CDC-recommended masks for healthcare professionals working with infectious patients).

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23 Athletes Who Love Giving Their Money Away

Athletes are known for using their massive salaries and endorsement deals to furnish lavish lifestyles — sometimes to the point of going broke. Plenty of athletes, however, give back by reaching for their own checkbooks to donate to charities, fund disaster-relief efforts, sponsor scholarships and bolster their alma maters — because not all athletes are looking to just make outrageous purchases.

Last updated: March 2, 2020

Steph Curry

Golden State Warriors three-point wizard Steph Curry has long loaned his celebrity to charities and causes, but he’s no stranger to digging deep himself. In 2017, he donated $118,000 of his own money to Hurricane Harvey relief. In 2019, he gave an unspecified seven-figure donation to Howard University to establish a golf team. A year earlier, he gave $25,000 to the wife of a golfer who was battling cancer.

Ronda Rousey

No one in history has done more to put women’s MMA

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How the couple who were supposed to ‘modernise the monarchy’ turned their backs on it

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex on their wedding day, 19 May, 2018: POOL/AFP via Getty Images
The Duke and Duchess of Sussex on their wedding day, 19 May, 2018: POOL/AFP via Getty Images

The 9 July marks 100 days since Prince Harry and Meghan Markle stood down as senior members of the royal family. The break, which became widely known as ‘Megxit’, marked a new chapter in the history of the monarchy. But why did it happen? [This article was originally published in January 2020].

It was the relationship that was supposed to mark the modernisation of the monarchy; instead, it became a turbulent tale of celebrity obsession, social media and family turmoil. In January, Meghan Markle and Prince Harry announced that they would be stepping down as senior members of the royal family in a move that shocked the world – yet wasn’t entirely unexpected.

In a statement on their Instagram page, the couple wrote: “After many months of reflection and internal discussions, we have

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Teachers weigh risks as COVID-19 looms

Christy Karwatt teaches social studies, but she’s been thinking more like a math teacher the last few days.

At 61, the Sarasota High teacher is entering her 27th year in Florida’s retirement system, and she loves her job. She had planned on teaching three more years to maximize her retirement payment. 

But as COVID-19 cases continue to spike across the state and the country, officials are pouring on pressure to reopen schools full time this fall.

On Monday, Florida’s education commissioner ordered the state’s schools to open full-time in August. U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on Tuesday criticized plans to offer in-person instruction only a few days a week. And the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is reworking its guidance on reopening schools after President Donald Trump thought the guidelines were too tough. 

Early guidance from health experts: Scheduled days home, more online learning, lots of hand-washing

In the

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US hits daily record; New Jersey to require masks outdoors; United Airlines announces major layoffs

As the Ivy League cancelled fall sports over coronavirus concerns Wednesday, hospitalizations continued to rise and ICU beds were quickly filling as the nation surpassed 3 million coronavirus cases.

The stunning milestone hit less than six months after the first confirmed case was reported Jan. 21, in Everett, Washington. Tuesday saw a record 60,021 new cases as the nationwide surge showed no signs of ebbing. In hopes slowing spread in his state, New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy said he would require masks outdoors.

The number of new daily cases has risen exponentially since the middle of last month, reaching a record high of 57,209 on July 3. At a Senate hearing last week, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases, testified that the U.S. is “going in the wrong direction” and that he “would not be surprised if we go up to 100,000 a

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