Hospital

‘America’s Got Talent’s’ Caly Bevier discusses music, relationships and moving on

For the second episode of In The Know: Profiles, we traveled to Los Angeles to meet with Caly Bevier, who had a breakout journey to the semifinals on Season 11 of “America’s Got Talent.” But before she was on TV and before she was being followed by more than 88,000 people on social media, she was stuck and sick in her hometown in Ohio.

“I never thought I could make singing or, like, being a musician into a career,” she told In The Know. “Everything kind of happened at once, I got diagnosed with cancer.”

Bevier was diagnosed with ovarian cancer when she was only 15. “I was either always stuck in my bed at home or stuck in a bed in the hospital,” she said. “I just felt even more sick not being able to go outside and enjoy nature and enjoy life.”

It was an incredibly difficult road

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How many positive tests before we pull the plug on college football?

So it looks like college football, collectively, is prepared to wait for one of its players or staffers to get critically ill or worse before it pulls the plug on summer workouts. As the positive COVID-19 tests pile up, as players pile into bars and pile out infected, few colleges are taking a step back and asking, “Should we really be doing this right now?”

They should not. That is unfortunate. It is also obvious.

The relentless push for college football is above all else financial, although not necessarily in the same cynical way as the opposition to athletes capitalizing on their image rights. Athletic department budgets are built around football. The money football brings in funds scholarships and creates jobs. It puts food on tables. It is the lifeblood of college athletics. Delaying the season or, worse, going without one will impose an unprecedented austerity, and while that reckoning

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As universities plan for students’ return amid coronavirus, some schools worry about risky ‘culture’

Heather Adams, a rising junior at American University, recently came to terms with a new reality: she won’t be heading back to campus in Washington, D.C. this fall. Though her school announced precautions to help keep students safe from the novel coronavirus, Adams said she wasn’t convinced.

“It feels like they are opening up irresponsibly and for their own benefit to get more money and I don’t feel like they’re really taking our safety into account as much as they need to,” Adams said.

Dana Damiani, a rising senior at Nazareth College in New York, however, isn’t about to miss her last year.

“I decided to go back because I have one year left and I trust my professors and the university to keep me safe,” said Damiani. “I am not going to stay home when I have the chance to be with my friends and take classes on campus.”

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Coronavirus positive: Good news round up

Undated handout photo issued by St Moritz Hotel & Spa of individual striped beach huts near Rock, Cornwall, where the hotel has been building a purpose-built socially distanced restaurant believed to be the first of its kind. - St Moritz Hotel & Spa
Undated handout photo issued by St Moritz Hotel & Spa of individual striped beach huts near Rock, Cornwall, where the hotel has been building a purpose-built socially distanced restaurant believed to be the first of its kind. – St Moritz Hotel & Spa

News of socially distanced dining to end the week, with what is thought to be the UK’s first purpose-built socially distant restaurant.

St Moritz Hotel & Spa, near Rock in Cornwall, will be able to welcome guests in self-contained accommodation from July 4 – and there will be a restaurant perfect for these unprecedented times for patrons to enjoy as well.

The eatery will see guests seated in private dining rooms, and what it might lack in the hustle and bustle of a busy restaurant from pre-Covid times, it will more than make up for in a sense of luxury and ocassion.

Business in Cornwall has been

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Jonty Bravery sentenced over Tate Modern attempted murder

Jonty Bravery has been sentenced after throwing a six-year-old boy from the Tate Modern viewing platform. (PA)
Jonty Bravery has been sentenced after throwing a six-year-old boy from the Tate Modern viewing platform. (PA)

An autistic teenager who told police he wanted to be “on the news” after throwing a six-year-old boy from the Tate Modern viewing platform has been jailed for life.

Jonty Bravery, 18, who admitted attempted murder of the child in December last year, appeared at the Old Bailey via video link on Friday, wearing wearing a white T-shirt and dark shorts.

The court was told Bravery “laughed and shrugged” when he was shown the CCTV of the incident.

Prosecutor Deanna Heer said: “He said he wanted to be on the news so that everyone, especially his parents, could see what a mistake they had made by not putting him in hospital.”

Emergency crews attending a scene at the Tate Modern art gallery following the incident in August 2019. (AP)
Emergency crews attending a scene at the Tate Modern art gallery following the incident in August 2019. (AP)

Heer said Bravery had

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Pregnant women may be more likely to suffer severe coronavirus infections, according to the largest study of its kind

pregnant women and coronavirus 4x3
pregnant women and coronavirus 4×3

Crystal Cox/Business Insider; Samantha Lee/Business Insider

  • A government analysis has found that pregnant women with COVID-19 are more likely to be hospitalized, admitted to the ICU, and put on ventilators than infected non-pregnant women. 

  • The report also found that Black and Hispanic pregnant women were more susceptible to the virus than white pregnant women. 

  • It’s unclear how many hospitalized women were admitted for labor and delivery versus coronavirus complications. 

  • Much remains unknown about how the coronavirus affects pregnant women and their future children, but the report underscores the importance of taking serious precautions and addressing racial disparities. 

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Pregnant women with COVID-19, the disease the coronavirus causes, are more likely to be hospitalized, admitted to the intensive care unit, and put on ventilators than non-pregnant women with the disease, according to a new CDC analysis including over 90,000 US

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Teen who pushed boy off Tate viewing platform blamed social services and said he was ‘mad’

Jonty Bravery, 18, claimed he wanted to highlight his apparent discontent with his treatment for a host of mental health issues - HANDOUT
Jonty Bravery, 18, claimed he wanted to highlight his apparent discontent with his treatment for a host of mental health issues – HANDOUT

The teenager who threw a six-year-old from a viewing platform at the Tate Modern laughed and told the child’s father “Yes, I am mad” before blaming social services for his actions, a court has heard.

Jonty Bravery, 18, who is autistic, has pleaded guilty to attempted murder after scooping up the boy and hurling him over the railings “without any hesitation” last August in front of his horrified parents. 

A sentence hearing at the Old Bailey heard that he had planned the incident “well in advance” and had researched the easiest way to kill someone as he had been “seriously unhappy” and wanted to get out of his supported accommodation.

Deanna Heer, prosecuting, told the court:  “He said he had to prove a point to ‘every idiot’

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Reopening technical schools offer preview for fall colleges

MILWAUKEE – Under normal circumstances, there would be nothing particularly extraordinary about a group of aspiring surgical technicians gathering for a lab course at Milwaukee Area Technical College.

But when a group of seven students sat around a room at the school’s downtown campus earlier this month, they became some of the first collegians to return to the classrooms they had walked away from when the coronavirus pandemic hit. They also got a glimpse of what things could look like for college students across the country come fall.

They all wore masks. They kept their distance when possible. They had their temperatures taken upon arrival and followed markings on the floor to their classrooms.

Kimberly Lopez of West Allis has her gown tied as instructor Mary Kunicki, program director for the surgical tech program, talks through the process of properly putting on a surgical gown for a surgical tech class at Milwaukee Area Technical College in Milwaukee.
Kimberly Lopez of West Allis has her gown tied as instructor Mary Kunicki, program director for the surgical tech program, talks through the process of properly putting on a surgical gown for a surgical tech class
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Gone with the Wind returns to HBO Max with slavery warning

Vivien Leigh and Hattie McDaniel both won Oscars for their work in the film
Vivien Leigh and Hattie McDaniel both won Oscars for their work in the film

Gone With The Wind has been reinstated by HBO Max, alongside a disclaimer saying it “denies the horrors of slavery”.

The 1939 film, set during and after the American Civil War, was removed by the streaming site earlier this month.

HBO Max said at the time it showed “ethnic and racial prejudices” that “were wrong then and are wrong today”.

Now, it has returned online, also accompanied by two videos discussing the film’s historical context.

One shows TV host and film scholar Jacqueline Stewart noting how the popular movie’s depiction of black people was controversial even at the time of release.

‘Deeply concerned’

“Producer David O Selznick was well aware that black audiences were deeply concerned about the film’s handling of the topic of slavery and its treatment of black characters,” she says.

“The film’s treatment

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Portugal likely to miss out as details of ‘air bridge’ deals emerge

Britons will have to wait to return to the Algarve - istock
Britons will have to wait to return to the Algarve – istock

Portugal is the most popular destination for British holidaymakers likely to miss out on the first wave of air bridge agreements set to be announced this weekend. 

The country’s tourist board is likely to be deeply disappointed. Luis Araujo, chief executive of Visit Portugal, this week told the Telegraph that he was optimistic the UK would be “fully confident” for Britons to return. “We are very excited to be welcoming them back,” he said. Portugal welcomed 2.5million visitors from the UK last year. 

However, according to sources, the country’s recent spike in coronavirus cases has meant Portugal will have to wait before enjoying friction-less travel with the UK. 

Turkey, Croatia and the US are three other popular destinations not to be included in the first tranche of deals.

France, Spain and Italy, however, will be included in the

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