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People ‘shot dead’ in Lagos, Nigeria

A protester sits on a barricade blocking a road in Lagos, Nigeria. Photo: 20 October 2020
Protesters in Lagos built barricades, blocking roads in Nigeria’s commercial hub

A number of people taking part in a protest against police brutality have reportedly been shot dead or wounded in Nigeria’s biggest city, Lagos.

Witnesses said up to 12 people were killed and others wounded when soldiers opened fire. Amnesty International said it had “credible reports” of deaths.

The army dismissed the reports as “fake news”. President Muhammadu Buhari has appealed for calm.

An indefinite 24-hour curfew has been imposed on Lagos and other regions.

The BBC’s Nduka Orjinmo in Nigeria said a small group of protesters were defying the curfew on Wednesday and had gathered at the Lekki toll plaza in Lagos where the shooting took place.

Protests over a now-disbanded police unit, the Special Anti-Robbery Squad (Sars), have been continuing for two weeks. The protesters are using the social media hashtag #EndSars to rally crowds.

Reacting to

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My brother had COVID-19 and a congressman helped save his life | Opinion

By Dan McNamara

As the election comes upon us, and in response to certain statements made by Congressman Chris Smith’s opponent, Stephanie Schmidt. Contrary to Ms. Schmidt’s claims, Congressman Smith has been a champion for those battling COVID-19. His intervention saved my brother’s life.

My brother, Kevin T. McNamara, a father of three from Avon, became ill last March with COVID-19. What was expected to be a brief stay in Jersey Shore University hospital morphed into a 174-day journey through bureaucratic hell. Time and time again, insurance companies denied my brother the proper care needed to have a fighting chance to stay alive. Just when we thought we were at a dead end, we reached out to Congressman Smith. Only then did things take a decidedly positive turn.

When things were most dire, and when we thought we lost Kevin, Congressman Smith moved heaven and earth to get Kevin the

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WS/FCS school board to consider delay of phased re-entry plan for students

WS/FCS school board to consider delay of phased re-entry plan for students


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DIAGNOSED WITH COVID-19 SURVIVES A STROKE AND A HEART ATTACK. HER MESSAGE TODAY AFTER SPENDING MONTHS IN THE HOSPITAL. KENNY: HAPPENING NOW, SOME GUILFORD COUNTY STUDENTS COULD RETURN TO CLASSROOMS NEXT WEEK. TALITHA: JUSTIN HAS THEIR MESSAGE, LIVE. >> I WILL TELL YOU, THERE WERE A LOT OF FOLKS OUT HERE TONIGHT, MANY WEARING RED AND HOLDING SIGNS. IT WAS PUT ON BY THE FORSYTH COUNTY OF EDUCATE — COUNTY EDUCATORS AND THEY SAY THEIR MAIN MESSAGE IS TO MAKE SURE THAT SCHOOLS OPEN UP SAFELY AND THEY DO NOT WANT TO SEE KIDS OR STAFF GETTING SICK. THE PRESIDENT OF THE FORSYTH COUNTY ASSOCIATION OF EDUCATORS SAYS THEY HAVE SENT RECOMMENDATIONS TO THE SCHOOL BOARD THAT INCLUDE ADDING MORE STAFF TO SCHOOLS. >> WE NEED MORE

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UDOT seeking public input on transportation projects in southern Utah County | Spanish Fork News

The Utah Department of Transportation is seeking public input on two transportation projects in southern Utah County — including the construction of a new Interstate 15 interchange in Spanish Fork and widening the 1600 South 2700 N. corridor leading to Springville — and will hold a public hearing next week.

During Tuesday’s Spanish Fork City Council meeting, Brian Atkinson of Pleasant Grove-based Horrocks Engineers, who UDOT hired as a consultant for an environmental assessment of the projects, said transportation officials have “been working on this (for) about a year,” noting that they met with the public in November to start “getting feedback and input from those along the corridor.”

“We found that by putting a new interchange on I-15, we can reduce some of the delays that we’re seeing today and we’ll see in the future there at that 400 South interchange,” Atkinson told the city council. “So we see

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Lincoln Project’s anti-Trump ads show power of biting satire

<span class="caption">If he's laughing, it's probably not at the Lincoln Project's satire.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://newsroom.ap.org/detail/Election2020Trump/42fe3a9441a149b4b2bc2814926266b0/photo" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin">AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin</a></span>
If he’s laughing, it’s probably not at the Lincoln Project’s satire. AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin

The narrator in a recent Lincoln Project ad tells listeners, “In six months, COVID-19 has killed more Americans than any disease in a hundred years. Donald Trump lied about it, rejected science, and still has no plan to save Americans.”

The narrator tells listeners that, unlike Trump, Democratic challenger Joe Biden has a plan for the virus, while a second voice, in the background, reads the names of some of those who have died of the coronavirus.

The ad ends with the narrator saying, “On November 3, vote like your life depends on it.”

The ads, which air on television and online, were created by the Lincoln Project, a political action committee founded by longtime Republican strategists and staffers, including Steve Schmidt, who ran John McCain’s 2008 presidential campaign; Rick Wilson, ad maker for

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Jeffrey Toobin’s alleged indecent Zoom exposure shows some men have learned nothing from #MeToo

Reporter Jeffrey Toobin
Legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin leaves the Supreme Court on March 27, 2012. (Charles Dharapak / Associated Press)

Oh dear. It may have finally happened. A famous man on a Zoom call allegedly “took it out,” as Julia Louis-Dreyfus’ character Elaine once put it so succinctly on “Seinfeld.”

According to Vice, which broke the story, Jeffrey Toobin was apparently engaged in an act of self-touching as his colleagues looked on, one imagines, in horror.

What was Toobin thinking?

The 60-year-old New Yorker writer and CNN legal analyst apologized to his family, friends and colleagues for reportedly being caught with his pants down during a Zoom call about potential election outcomes with other New Yorker luminaries, including Jane Mayer, Evan Osnos and Jelani Cobb.

Toobin said he erroneously believed that he had “muted” the Zoom video.

I guess I believe him. I mean, no one in his right mind would do

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One in ten ambulance call-outs during Covid pandemic for mental health reasons

Mental health was responsible for one in 10 ambulance call-outs during the coronavirus pandemic, figures for London have revealed.

Of 826,396 incidents attended between January and September, 81,644 – 10 per cent – had a mental health element.

Mental health incidents have increased each month since March, when lockdown measures were introduced.

June saw the highest proportion of attended call-outs involving mental health, making up 12 per cent of the total, or one in eight calls.

The figures have been compiled by the London Ambulance Service (LAS), whose consultant nurse for mental health, Carly Lynch, said: “A busy emergency department is not always the right place for someone experiencing a mental health crisis – it can often be an extremely traumatic experience.

“The paramedic and mental health nurse are able to treat both their physical and mental health needs and, once they have assessed the patient, they can encourage them

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Boone County Commissioner candidates talk issues | Elections

BOONE COUNTY – It’s the home stretch for candidates in Boone County staking their spot in local governments.

Current commissioner Fred Parry and former State Auditor employee Justin Aldred are running for Boone County Commissioner.

Voters elected Parry as Commissioner in 2016. He is a long-time magazine publisher and small business owner. He spent 14 years as a Boone Hospital trustee, and eight years as a Columbia Housing Authority Commissioner. 



Fred Parry

Fred Parry


“This is a community that I love very much and I am very committed to,” Parry said.

Aldred worked under Nicole Galloway in the Missouri’s State Auditor Office. He worked on sunshine law compliance, rooting out waste, fraud and abuse. He was a U.S. Army Officer under the Missouri National Guard.

“I’m running for this office because I believe I have a unique set of skills and experiences that fit the challenges of this office,” Aldred said.

Both

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Breast cancer patient describes how support network disappeared during lockdown

When lockdown began, Lori Delaney was plunged into a darker and more lonely place than most of us could ever imagine.

The mother-of-two had only recently been diagnosed with breast cancer and had just embarked on a course of agonising chemotherapy.

Despite the ordeal, until that point she had felt supported and safe within the system, receiving phone calls every other day from nurses and receiving plenty of support from family and friends. But overnight, that support was taken away.

“There was this big thing happening in my life and I was everyone’s priority and then the pandemic hit. The pandemic was the priority.

“All of a sudden, there were no phone calls. It felt like everything stopped. It was very difficult for my mum because she wanted to be here and couldn’t. I felt so lonely, there was nobody able to help me.”

Mrs Delaney, 34, from Glasgow, was

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As White House eyes ‘herd immunity,’ Sweden’s no-mask approach is failing to contain COVID-19

BARCELONA — Fresh from arrival at Spain’s El Prat Airport, the bald, middle-aged man strode across the terrace of a popular Barcelona restaurant, giving bear hugs and dramatically kissing old friends as well as new acquaintances. “He was touching everybody and spit-talking,” said Carmen Oko, a teacher, “and he kept coughing in everyone’s faces.” When Oko yelled across the terrace demanding that the visitor cover his mouth when he coughed, he told her to stop being paranoid, everyone would eventually get COVID-19 anyway. 

When another witness to the spectacle asked why he was blatantly defying public health recommendations, he said that Spain, where face masks are mandated (except for in restaurants, now believed to be a major source of spread), has it all wrong. The correct approach, he said, was that of his home country of Sweden, where the government has taken a laissez-faire attitude, strongly discouraging mask use, emphasizing

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