Health

CDC won’t revise guidelines for opening schools; deaths surge in California, Texas; Trump again blames testing

Federal health guidelines for reopening schools across the nation will not be altered despite complaints from President Donald Trump that they are too difficult and expensive, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday.

Vice President Mike Pence had said Wednesday that the CDC would next week issue “a new set of tools, five different documents that will be giving even more clarity on the guidance going forward.” Documents, yes, new guidelines, no, Redfield told ABC’s “Good Morning America.” He also stressed that guidelines are not requirements.

“Our guidelines are our guidelines, but we are going to provide additional reference documents to basically aid communities in trying to open K-through-12s,” Redfield said. “It’s not a revision of the guidelines.”

Also Thursday, Trump again defended the nation’s booming number of coronavirus cases as a function of testing.

“For the 1/100th time, the reason we show so many

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With coronavirus surging, bars and indoor dining could remain closed for the foreseeable future

Conor Susi, center, takes orders from a dine-in group in downtown Los Angeles on June 6. Indoor restaurants were ordered shut in L.A. County on July 1. <span class="copyright">(Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times)</span>
Conor Susi, center, takes orders from a dine-in group in downtown Los Angeles on June 6. Indoor restaurants were ordered shut in L.A. County on July 1. (Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times)

With coronavirus cases surging in California, there are growing doubts that indoor dining and bar service will reopen anytime soon as health officials zero-in on how to slow the spread of COVID-19.

Public health officials say indoor dining and drinking pose more significant public health risks than other retail activities, even with social distancing. Patrons must take off their masks to eat and drink, they often are engaged in conversation and breathe in indoor air that may be contaminated by the virus and get circulated by air conditioning — all of which can spread COVID-19.

Restaurants are the lifeblood of the retail economy in many cities, and the reopening of dine-in service followed by the abrupt closures have left

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Best Ways To Sell Your Car During the Coronavirus Crisis

Thanks to the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic, life across the globe has turned upside down. Even formerly common activities, such as dining out or shopping for groceries, have become difficult to conduct safely in 2020. Selling a car is no exception, as the process generally involves close contact with a number of people. GOBankingRates came up with a list of safety precautions for you to consider so that you can still sell your car safely during the coronavirus crisis.

Last updated: July 9, 2020

Thoroughly Clean and Disinfect Your Car

No matter when you are selling your car, you should thoroughly clean and sanitize it before you show it to buyers. However, in the COVID-19 era, a thorough disinfection is required.

Not only will disinfecting keep both you and your potential buyers safe, it can also be used in your marketing ad. Certain buyers may be interested to know that you

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Lawmakers request monthly COVID-19 misinformation reports from online platforms

“Over the past several months, we have seen a troubling rise of false or misleading information related to COVID-19 disseminated by domestic and foreign actors on platforms such as yours. This disinformation has ranged from false statements about certain groups being immune from contracting the virus to unsubstantiated assertions about masks and vaccines. This type of disinformation is dangerous and can affect the health and well-being of people who use this false information to make critical health decisions during this pandemic.”

The tech giants reportedly agreed to provide the European Commission with detailed monthly disinformation reports back in June, and that’s something the lawmakers noted in their letters. “[W]e request that your company provide the Committee with monthly reports similar in scope to what you are providing the European Commission regarding your COVID-19 disinformation efforts as they relate to United States users of your platform,” they added.

There are plenty

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Coronavirus spike jeopardizes opening of schools, L.A. County’s top health official warns

Cerritos Elementary School Principal Perla Chavez-Fritz, left, shows her Glendale campus to L.A. County schools Supt. Debra Duardo. School districts statewide face decisions on how and when to reopen their campuses. <span class="copyright">(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Cerritos Elementary School Principal Perla Chavez-Fritz, left, shows her Glendale campus to L.A. County schools Supt. Debra Duardo. School districts statewide face decisions on how and when to reopen their campuses. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

The pending reopening of K-12 campuses is suddenly at risk because of the ongoing surge of coronavirus cases, and all public and private schools must prepare for students to continue learning entirely from home, Los Angeles County’s top public health official has told local education leaders.

This sobering message was delivered by county Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer, in what she termed an “off the record” phone call Tuesday afternoon with district superintendents and others that was not intended for the media or the public. The Times obtained a recording of the call.

“Every single school district at this point needs to have plans in place to continue distance learning for 100% of

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With No End in Sight to the Coronavirus, Some Teachers Are Retiring Rather Than Going Back to School

When Christina Curfman thought about whether she could return to her second-grade classroom in the fall, she struggled to imagine the logistics. How would she make sure her 8-year-old students kept their face masks on all day? How would they do hands-on science experiments that required working in pairs? How would she keep six feet of distance between children accustomed to sharing desks and huddling together on one rug to read books?

“The only way to keep kids six feet apart is to have four or five kids,” says Curfman, a teacher at Catoctin Elementary School in Leesburg, Virginia, who typically has 22 students in a class. Her district shut schools on March 12, and at least 55 staff members have since tested positive for the coronavirus. “Classrooms in general are pretty tight,” she says. “And then how do you teach a reading group, how do you teach someone one-on-one

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Atlanta mayor to sign order mandating masks

ATLANTA — Atlanta’s mayor says she will sign an executive order mandating masks in Georgia’s largest city, defying Gov. Brian Kemp’s decision to encourage voluntary masking.

Spokesman Michael Smith says Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms plans to sign an order requiring masks, which could set up a confrontation with the Republican Kemp.

Like several other local leaders in Georgia, Bottoms has unsuccessfully appealed to Kemp to change his order that local governments can’t exceed the state’s requirements. Bottoms announced she tested positive for the coronavirus on Monday.

“Other cities have taken the approach that they are going to defy the governor’s executive order. Savannah has done it, some other cities have done it, and Atlanta is going to do it today,” Bottoms told MSNBC in a Wednesday interview. “Because the fact of the matter is that COVID-19 is wreaking havoc on our cities, specifically black and brown communities with higher death

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A Q&A with Michael V. Drake

The University of California announced its new president, Dr. Michael V. Drake, on Tuesday. Drake, will oversee 10 campuses, five medical centers, three national laboratories and a nearly $40 billion operation.

History was made, as Drake is the first person of color to serve in this role. He replaces the current UC president, Janet Napolitano, who is stepping down after leading for seven years.

Drake is also taking the reins as the 21st president in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic as students and faculty transition to mostly online instruction for the fall. The university system’s 280,000 students and 227,000 employees face a hybrid set of plans for the fall. Most classes at UC Davis have moved online, but several courses are still being taught in-person.

Drake, who spent much of his childhood in Sacramento and graduated from C.K. McClatchy High School in 1967, spoke with The Sacramento Bee just

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A Q&A with Michael Drake, the new University of California president

The University of California announced its new president, Dr. Michael V. Drake, on Tuesday. Drake, will oversee 10 campuses, five medical centers, three national laboratories and a nearly $40 billion operation.

History was made, as Drake is the first person of color to serve in this role. He replaces the current UC president, Janet Napolitano, who is stepping down after leading for seven years.

Drake is also taking the reins as the 21st president in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic as students and faculty transition to mostly online instruction for the fall. The university system’s 280,000 students and 227,000 employees face a hybrid set of plans for the fall. Most classes at UC Davis have moved online, but several courses are still being taught in-person.

Drake, who spent much of his childhood in Sacramento and graduated from C.K. McClatchy High School in 1967, spoke with The Sacramento Bee just

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How to Make Natural Dyes From Things You Already Have Around Your House

From avocado pits to turmeric powder.

Ocean Rose with yarn she dyed.
Ocean Rose with yarn she dyed.

We were a couple months into quarantine when my best friend announced to me that they had started dyeing their clothes with things they found around their kitchen. 

First there was a cropped knit dyed a brilliant yellow by turmeric root, then a button-up turned pink with the help of some beets. When we met up in a park to wave hello at our first socially-distant hangout, they picked a few small fistfuls of green grass to take home and experiment with, too. 

While the grass dye didn’t have quite the effect intended (it turned a white T-shirt “the faintest faintest brown,” they later told me), their interest in it helped me to start seeing all kinds of plants around me — from my kitchen waste to the flower petals strewn on the ground in the nearby cemetery

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