Eufemia Didonato

Cuomo says New York will review vaccines approved by feds; fears of a second wave in Europe

New York state officials will conduct a review of any coronavirus vaccines approved by the federal government before recommending them to New Yorkers, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Thursday.

Cuomo said he feared President Donald Trump would strongarm the Food and Drug Administration into using insufficiently rigorous standards to approve vaccines. 

“We are going to put together our own review committee that will advise me, so i can look at the camera and I can say, ‘It is safe to take,'” Cuomo said.

In Houston, a new study indicates the coronavirus, which has infected almost 7 million people in the U.S. alone, may have mutated to a strain that’s more contagious, though not more deadly.

In Britain, the government is considering a plan to intentionally infect healthy volunteers to expedite a determination on which vaccine candidates are effective.

In Missouri, the city of St. Charles has banned music in clubs after

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B.C.’s Dr. Bonnie Henry responds to death threats, offers hope for Thanksgiving

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety.

Currently, there are more than 6,771 active cases of COVID-19 in Canada (with more than 134,900 diagnoses so far) and 9,100 deaths. Nearly 90 per cent of the country’s reported COVID-19 cases have recovered.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

September 24

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If You Suffer from Allergies, Plant These Flower Varieties

Getty / lesichkadesign

Do you suffer from outdoor or seasonal allergies? If so, you may feel like your options for planting flowers in your backyard are limited. After all, the pollen output in some varieties can trigger an intense response for many people. But just because you suffer from this ailment doesn’t mean you have to forgo flowers all together. There are several options out there that cause minimal irritation—you just need to know which ones (and then make sure they’ll grow in your region). Here, an allergist and a floral expert outline which types of blooms will trigger your seasonal and outdoor allergies the least. Plus, they offer their best tips for mitigating irritation in the first place.

Related: Is It Seasonal Allergies or a Cold?

Roses and tulips are safest.

Christina Stembel, the founder and CEO of Farmgirl Flowers, suggests allergy sufferers plant roses and tulips. “Both of

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Charles Peterson, who scouted for the Cardinals, lost to Covid-19

This fall would have been Charles Edward “Pete” Peterson Jr.’s fourth year as a volunteer football coach at Spring Valley High School in Columbia, South Carolina, and his eighth season as a scout for the St. Louis Cardinals.

Peterson this year signed third baseman Jordan Walker, the Cardinals’ first-round draft pick.

Peterson had hoped to see his 17-year-old son, Trey, the star outside linebacker, run the field this fall, and watch his kid get offers to play college football.

But in mid-August, Peterson was admitted to Prisma Health Richland Hospital, where he was soon put on a ventilator. He never left the hospital. Peterson succumbed to Covid-19 on Sept. 13. He was 46.

“The last time I spoke to Charles, he was in the hospital,” said one of Peterson’s best friends, Mitchell Moton, another Spring Valley coach. “He said to me: ‘This virus is real. Make sure Trey is OK.'”

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10 New Digital Fitness Platforms To Reinvigorate Your Home Workouts

It’s been more than six months since everyone’s lives shifted amid the global pandemic. Offices cleared out, fitness studios closed their doors, and our homes became the places we truly did everything. After a while, your fitness routine can start to lose its luster, and that’s why these new digital fitness platforms can help breathe new life into your at-home workouts.

One thing that quarantine brought the world—aside from TikTok dances and a new level of Netflix binge-watching—was a boom of digital fitness platforms. With gyms and fitness studios closed and many instructors out of work, there was a hustle to make everything virtual as quickly as possible. If you’ve been wanting to spice up your routine and try something new, these are some of the best new options available.

The best new digital fitness platforms of 2020

1. Erika Bloom Pilates

Cost: $90/month

Celebrity Pilates instructor Erika Bloom is

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‘Be The Bridge’; Trash Talk; Truth’s Truths

ACROSS AMERICA — “Be the bridge,” Bethany Bernhard and like-minded people the Milwaukee area say in their racial reconciliation group by the same name.

The mantra isn’t just words. It’s action.

Bernhard was horrified when she saw racially charged graffiti spray painted over a sign advertising his boat for sale. She thought about her Black friends and how the message of hate would hurt their hearts.

She and her neighbor, Stephanie Kosidowski, got their own spray paint cans.

“Be kind,” the new sign instructs. By Karen Pilarski for Waukesha Patch

Below are 14 more stories from Patch editors that will make you smile.

Trash Talk

Stephanie Hongo loves to talk trash. She’s kind of entitled because, after all, she’s turned it into an art form. The Connecticut artist often met with questions about what it means to be a trash sculptor. Basically, the artist who goes by “Sugarfox” turns things

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Canada Recovery Benefit unveiled, ‘No value’ in swabbing asymptomatic people, doctors warn

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety.

Currently, there are more than 6,771 active cases of COVID-19 in Canada (with more than 134,900 diagnoses so far) and 9,100 deaths. Nearly 90 per cent of the country’s reported COVID-19 cases have recovered.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

September 24

Read More

15 helpful products you never knew existed

15 helpful products you never knew existed
15 helpful products you never knew existed

— Recommendations are independently chosen by Reviewed’s editors. Purchases you make through our links may earn us a commission.

You’ve been shopping online so often this quarantine you can practically recite all of Amazon’s inventory. But just when you thought you’ve seen it all, you realize there are hundreds of hidden gems still waiting to be discovered. A.k.a. the internet is full of products you never knew existed, from brilliant kitchen gadgets to fitness devices, innovative tech gear, and more. Below, we’ve uncovered 15 incredibly useful things that will improve your everyday life—and make for some great conversation starters.

1. The world’s first weighted robe

Release the weight of the world with...more weight.
Release the weight of the world with…more weight.

You’ve heard of weighted blankets, but a weighted robe? Now that’s game-changing—and you can now get one from Gravity. Featuring removable three-pound collar pads, this super-plush 100-percent fleece robe

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Losing Your Hair Can Be Another Consequence of the Pandemic

Annrene Rowe was hospitalized for 12 days with coronavirus symptoms earlier this year; since then, she has noticed her hair falling out in clumps.(Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)
Annrene Rowe was hospitalized for 12 days with coronavirus symptoms earlier this year; since then, she has noticed her hair falling out in clumps.(Eve Edelheit/The New York Times)

Annrene Rowe was getting ready to celebrate her 10th wedding anniversary this summer when she noticed a bald spot on her scalp. In the following days, her thick, shoulder-length hair started falling out in clumps, bunching up in the shower drain.

“I was crying hysterically,” said Rowe, 67, of Anna Maria, Florida.

Rowe, who was hospitalized for 12 days in April with symptoms of the coronavirus, soon found strikingly similar stories in online groups of COVID-19 survivors. Many said that several months after contracting the virus, they began shedding startling amounts of hair.

Doctors say they too are seeing many more patients with hair loss, a phenomenon they believe is indeed related to the coronavirus pandemic, affecting both people who had the

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Cuomo says New York will review vaccines approved by feds; Missouri city bans dancing a la ‘Footloose’

New York state officials will conduct a review of any coronavirus vaccines approved by the federal government before recommending them to New Yorkers, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Thursday.

Cuomo said he feared President Donald Trump would strongarm the FDA into using insufficiently rigorous standards to approve vaccines.

“We are going to put together our own review committee that will advise me, so i can look at the camera and I can say ‘It is safe to take,'” Cuomo said.

In Houston, a study by researchers indicates the coronavirus, which has infected almost 7 million people in the U.S. alone, may have mutated to a more contagious strain if not more deadly.

In Britain, the government is considering a plan to intentionally infect healthy volunteers to expedite a determination on which vaccine candidates are effective.

In Missouri, Gov. Mike Parson, who balked at requiring masks, has tested positive for the virus.

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