Eufemia Didonato

Where to Buy Face Masks Online That Are Stylish

The fashion world is stepping up in a time of need: Countless companies are now making, selling and donating non-medical grade face masks for daily protection from COVID-19.

Demand for cloth face mask options has soared in recent months, in part because the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now recommends wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) masks in public settings to help slow the spread of COVID-19. PPE masks are usually made from breathable a fabric like cotton and differ from a surgical mask and N95 respirators that experts say should be reserved for health care workers who are caring for the sick.

In times of crisis, it’s heartwarming to see companies we love giving back using the tools and skills they know best. Nordstrom, the largest employer of tailors in the country, has trained its alterations teams to make face masks to distribute to health care workers, while designer

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B.C. urges country to keep borders closed, Ontario says school will look different

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 106,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and more than 8,700 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

July 9

5:15 p.m.: Quebec tightens measures for bars

The Quebec government is making changes to rules for bars after

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How much sleep you need each night and warning signs that you’re not getting enough, according to neuroscientists

If you find yourself dozing off during the day that could be a sign that you're getting insufficient sleep at night.
If you find yourself dozing off during the day that could be a sign that you’re getting insufficient sleep at night.

David Prado Perucha/Shutterstock

Most people spend about one-third of their day asleep. While scientists are still unsure exactly why we need sleep, they do know it rejuvenates the body and mind, making it critical for our daily functions. And a lack of sleep leads to cognitive impairments that you might not even notice, which may make it difficult to know if you are well-rested. 

Red flags you’re not getting enough sleep

Ashley Ingiosi, a neuroscientist researching sleep at Washington State University, says there are a couple of indicators that you can look out for to determine if you’re catching enough zzz’s. 

You fall asleep too quickly

“If you’re falling asleep within five minutes of crawling in the bed, you’re probably not getting enough sleep,” she says. Instead, it should

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Big Ten schools to only play conference games; CDC won’t rewrite school guidelines; Florida sees record death total

Florida saw an alarming increase in deaths and top federal health officials ran counter to President Donald Trump’s wishes, saying guidelines for reopening schools won’t be rewritten and some states should consider shutting down again as coronavirus cases spike nationwide Thursday.

The Big Ten announced it will limit its fall sports to only conference games, impacting several significant scheduled football games. The ACC pushed the start of its season back to Sept. 1.

Florida reported 120 deaths – almost 50% more than the previous one-day high of 83 in late April – as the state surpassed 4,000 deaths. Nationwide, the Johns Hopkins data dashboard reported a one-day total of 820 U.S. deaths and a near-record 58,601 new cases.

“Any state that is having a serious problem, that state should seriously look at shutting down,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said on “The

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The 10 Biggest Online Workout Mistakes, According to Trainers

Though gyms are beginning to reopen, at-home, online workouts aren’t going anywhere. Even if you’re a dedicated gym-goer, it’s undeniable that reducing your trips to communal spaces reduces your risk of getting COVID-19. 

Luckily, there are plenty of amazing streaming classes and workout apps to choose from. But just like any other type of workout tool, it does take some time to learn how to use these virtual sessions properly — increasing their effectiveness and decreasing your risk of injury. Ahead, top online trainers and instructors explain what they most often see going wrong with online workouts — and what to do instead. 

RELATED: The Best Free 15-Minute Workouts On the Internet

Mistake #1: Turning off your camera

If you’re doing a live class with the option to turn your camera on, don’t skip letting the trainer see you, says Ingrid Clay, Senior Curriculum Mentor and Trainer at Barry’s. 

“Turning

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How can you volunteer for an experimental COVID-19 vaccine? Start with this survey

If you want to sign up to bring scientists one step closer to discovering a successful coronavirus vaccine, then now is your time.

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases designed a “COVID-19 Prevention Trials Network” (COVPN) to help recruit the thousands of volunteers needed to determine which of a variety of “investigational vaccines” and antibody treatments protect people from the pathogen that has so far taken the lives of over half a million worldwide.

The first of the clinical trials to be conducted by COVPN will begin this summer and will test mRNA-1273, the vaccine candidate developed by biotechnology company Moderna, according to a news release by the National Institutes of Health.

The network is intended to conduct Phase 3 studies, meaning researchers will be able to learn if the products can actually prevent new coronavirus infections or if they help control the disease if not.

All you

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Teachers weigh risks of COVID-19

Christy Karwatt teaches social studies, but she’s been thinking more like a math teacher the past few days.

At 61, the Sarasota High School teacher is entering her 27th year in Florida’s system, and she loves her job. She had planned on teaching three more years to maximize her retirement payment. 

As COVID-19 cases spike across the country, officials pour on pressure to reopen schools full-time this fall.

Monday, Florida’s education commissioner ordered the state’s schools to open full-time in August. Tuesday, U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos criticized plans to offer in-person instruction only a few days a week. And the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is reworking its guidance on reopening schools after President Donald Trump said the guidelines were too tough. 

Early guidance from health experts: Scheduled days home, more online learning, lots of hand-washing

Karwatt began crunching the numbers on how much money she would sacrifice

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CDC won’t rewrite school guidelines; Florida district to ignore in-class mandate as numbers soar; Trump blames testing

Florida saw an alarming increase in deaths and top federal health officials ran counter to President Donald Trump’s wishes, saying guidelines for reopening schools won’t be rewritten and some states should consider shutting down again as coronavirus cases spike nationwide Thursday.

Florida reported 120 deaths – almost 50% more than the previous one-day high of 83 in late April – as the state surpassed 4,000 deaths. Nationwide, the Johns Hopkins data dashboard reported a one-day total of 820 U.S. deaths and a near-record 58,601 new cases.

“Any state that is having a serious problem, that state should seriously look at shutting down,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said on “The Journal” podcast.

Trump, who has complained that the CDC’s requirements for schools to reopen in the fall are too difficult and expensive, took to Twitter to blame increased testing for the nation’s

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Fetal coronavirus infection is possible, small study suggests

A small study strengthens evidence that a pregnant woman infected with the coronavirus might be able to spread it to her fetus.

Researchers from Italy said Thursday that they studied 31 women with COVID-19 who delivered babies in March and April. They found signs of the virus in several samples of umbilical cord blood, the placenta and, in one case, breast milk.

Full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak

Women shouldn’t panic. This doesn’t mean there’s viable virus in those places and “it’s too early to make guidelines” or to change care, said the study leader, Dr. Claudio Fenizia, an immunology specialist at the University of Milan.

Related: Of the 33 pregnant women studied, three later had babies with confirmed cases of the coronavirus. The babies all recovered well.

But it does merit more study, especially of women who are infected earlier in their pregnancies than these women, said Fenizia, who

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Tulsa City Health Official Says Trump Rally ‘Likely Contributed’ to Surge of New Coronavirus Cases

Tulsa City-County Health Department Director Dr. Bruce Dart says President Donald Trump’s campaign rally in Tulsa in late June “likely contributed” to the new surge of coronavirus cases in the area.

On Wednesday, Dart told the Associated Press that the large gathering “more than likely” contributed to the spike, as it drew in thousands of participants — and protesters.

“In the past few days, we’ve seen almost 500 new cases, and we had several large events just over two weeks ago, so I guess we just connect the dots,” Dart said.

Tulsa County reported 261 confirmed new cases on Monday, a one-day record high for the area. On Tuesday it reported another 206 cases. In the week leading up the rally, which took place on Saturday, June 20, the county only reported 76 cases on Monday and 96 on Tuesday, per the department’s database. 

As of Thursday afternoon, July 9,

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