Day: August 3, 2020

Where to Buy Clear Face Masks Online

The face mask has become an everyday staple. Wearing a face covering can help slow the spread of the coronavirus. It can also make it harder to hear and impossible to read lips, which makes day-to-day life in the age of social distancing especially difficult for the deaf and hard of hearing community.

But there’s an alternative! Clear face masks are a great option to increase visibility of the face. These masks feature transparent, see-through panels that allow others to read lips and see facial expressions, while still protecting the wearer from excessive exposure.

Available in various patterns and colors, several brands and stores are now offering clear face masks. Now you can protect yourself and others and see their lovely smile.

Many retailers have started offering personal protective equipment (PPE), including face masks for adults, face masks for kids, face masks with matching outfits and face masks for exercising.

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The U.S. Health Care System Is Designed To Fail When It’s Needed Most

The American health care system leaves us all vulnerable to massive costs and uneven access, even under the best of circumstances. But when the economy goes south, things get really awful.

The novel coronavirus pandemic and the United States’ feckless response to the outbreak has triggered a historic economic downturn that has cost tens of millions of jobs. Because almost half of the country ― about 160 million workers, spouses and dependents ― get their health coverage through an employer, those lost jobs almost always mean lost health insurance

Between February and May, an estimated 5.4 million people became uninsured because of job loss, according to the liberal advocacy organization Families USA. The group describes this as the largest loss of job-based health benefits in U.S. history, worse even than during the Great Recession in 2008 and 2009. 

And job losses have continued to mount since May, meaning

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Kate Middleton Remembers Her Great-Grandmother and Grandmother’s Contributions as Red Cross Nurses

Joe Giddens – WPA Pool/Getty Kate Middleton

The royal family is celebrating the 150th anniversary of the British Red Cross.

Kate Middleton, Queen Elizabeth and other members of the family paid tribute to British Red Cross staff and volunteers on Monday as the charity marks its milestone year.

Kate personally thanked 150 outstanding staff and volunteers, who were nominated by the charity for their contributions to received a commemorative coin created specially by the Royal Mint for the anniversary. In her letter, the royal mom recalled her own family ties to the Red Cross, with both her great-grandmother Olive Middleton and grandmother Valerie Middleton having served as Red Cross nurses during World War I and World War II, respectively.

“Like you and many others, they are both part of the rich history of the British Red Cross, which is helping to ensure many people get the support they need during

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What to know about sending your kids to college during the pandemic

How to go back to college safely during the pandemic
How to go back to college safely during the pandemic

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With the end of summer drawing near, college students and their parents are preparing for a new semester. But for most, going back to school this year will likely look a lot different amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Some colleges and universities are reopening as fully virtual this fall, while others will offer a mix of both online and in-person classes. Those that are choosing to invite students back to campus are doing so with strict sanitation procedures in place along with new changes, like reduced class sizes, solo dorm rooms, and limited dining options. Some are even closing campus after fall break to reduce any risk from out-of-state students who are traveling.

Hannah Grice, a junior at Stevenson University in

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Montclair Schools Will Have Mandatory Masks, Temperature Checks

MONTCLAIR, NJ — Regular temperature checks, mandatory face masks and possible outdoor learning/teaching spaces are all on the list of the latest coronavirus updates in store for Montclair’s public schools.

Montclair School Superintendent Jonathan Ponds recently released an update on reopening plans in the district amid the COVID-19 crisis.

“As you review this information, you may have more questions,” Ponds told parents and guardians. “We encourage you to email us as we will continue to adjust our plans to refine our protocols. Finally, another survey will be sent at the end of next week to gather information about how many children we can expect to see onsite, use of transportation, instructional questions and more.”

Some of the latest updates follow below, via the school district.

Instruction

As you know we are committed to providing a 100 percent remote option as well as a hybrid model that consists of both remote

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‘Hero’ father-of-seven died while rescuing his children who got into difficulty at sea

Jonathan Stevens died a hero saving children - UNPIXS (Europe)/Universal News And Sport (Scotland)
Jonathan Stevens died a hero saving children – UNPIXS (Europe)/Universal News And Sport (Scotland)

A “hero” father-of-seven died while rescuing his children who got into difficulty at sea.

Jonathan Stevens, 36, was reportedly caught in a rip tide as he tried to heave two of his children to safety during the incident in Barmouth, northwest Wales on Sunday afternoon.

Emergency services were called just before 2pm and the plasterer, from Telford in Shropshire, was retrieved from the water and taken to Ysbyty Gwynedd hospital by air ambulance, where he later passed away.

In a tribute, his partner Laura, who was at home when the incident happened, said: “Words can’t explain how we are all feeling, not only me and our kids but his other kids and his family.

“I owe this man everything bringing our babies back, just so sad that we have all lost him but I know he

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Rowan College To Offer In-Person, Remote Learning This Fall

BURLINGTON COUNTY, NJ — Rowan College at Burlington County will offer a limited number of on-campus courses this fall as the college prepares to reopen amid the coronavirus pandemic.

At the same time, the college said it will offer new types of online courses to increase engagement in the course while reducing the number of people on campus. For those who are on campus, measures will be in place to reduce the risk of spreading the coronavirus, according to the college’s website.

The college submitted a plan to the state on July 7 so that it could reopen its labs for summer courses. Officials said many of the details for the fall reopening plan were included in the submission, but those plans could change as they hear from the community and the pandemic evolves.

New Jersey Coronavirus Updates: Don’t miss local and statewide announcements about novel coronavirus precautions. Sign up

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Engineered decoys trap virus in test tube study; healthcare workers at high risk even with protections

By Nancy Lapid

(Reuters) – The following is a brief roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus.

Open https://graphics.reuters.com/HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/yxmvjqywprz/index.html in an external browser for a Reuters graphic on vaccines and treatments in development.

Engineered decoys trap virus before it can enter cells

The new coronavirus enters cells by attaching to a protein on the cell membrane called the ACE2 receptor. Scientists have now developed a decoy version of ACE2 that lures the virus and traps it, preventing it from infecting human lung cells in test tubes. “We have engineered our ACE2 Trap to bind 100 to 1,000 times tighter to the virus than normal ACE2 that is on victim cells. This provides even more potent blockage that is comparable to neutralizing antibodies,” Dr. James Wells of the University of California

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For These Women, Covid-19 Has Redefined What It Means to Be “Strong Like a Mama”

Photo credit: Photo courtesy of Heymama.co
Photo credit: Photo courtesy of Heymama.co

From Woman’s Day

Katya Libin and Amri Kibbler know all about the struggles working moms face during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Like countless working parents across the country, they’ve been forced to juggle their never-ending parenting responsibilities in tandem with their careers. They know the hardship of facilitating at-home e-learning while logging onto a Zoom meeting; of leading an important conference call with potential clients as you cook lunch for a very hungry, very impatient child.

They also know, firsthand, the importance of community. Libin was a 26-year-old working mother when she founded HeyMama, an online community for entrepreneurial moms dedicated to fostering community and providing opportunities, support, and resources for working mothers across the country. Since the brand’s launch in 2014, the HeyMama community has expanded to 11 cities and boasts members from across the globe.

And even though HeyMama, like countless other

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California passes 500,000 cases; 97% of residents on watchlist

California officially surpassed 500,000 total lab-confirmed coronavirus infections and set a new daily high for reported COVID-19 deaths over the weekend, while Sacramento County reached the 10,000-case mark.

The state reported 219 new deaths from the respiratory disease Saturday and another 132 Sunday to bring the pandemic’s official statewide death toll to 9,356, according to data from the California Department of Public Health.

Sacramento County health officials have confirmed 142 resident deaths from COVID-19, the disease caused by the highly contagious coronavirus, including 91 residing in the city of Sacramento.

The county suffered at least 49 COVID-19 deaths in July, making it the deadliest month of the health crisis so far. Sacramento County had 34 deaths from the virus in April, followed by 18 in each of May and June, according to public health officials’ data dashboard. The July count is likely to grow in the coming days because it

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