Month: July 2020

wounded Hong Kong police vow to keep enforcing law

Hong Kong (AFP) – Nine months ago he was burned by corrosive liquid hurled during anti-government protests, but Hong Kong police officer Ling says he has no regrets and remains devoted to being a law enforcer.

Officers like Ling have formed the spear tip of Beijing’s pushback against huge and often violent pro-democracy protests in the restless finance hub.

Seven months of clashes last year have left the city bitterly divided with swathes of the population loathing police — and many officers feeling they have been unfairly vilified.

Now the police have been given expanded powers under a sweeping new national security law imposed by Beijing that aims to crush the democracy movement once and for all.

“It’s undeniable that Hong Kong is part of China, it’s reasonable to set up a national security law on Chinese territory,” Ling told AFP in an interview at police headquarters the week before

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Virus poses cultural threat to Brazil’s Amazon people

Amajari (Brasil) (AFP) – In the heart of the Brazilian Amazon, the advance of COVID-19 presents indigenous people with a cruel cultural dilemma — remain in their villages with little medical help, or seek safety in the city and risk being deprived of their ancestral funeral rites.

Lucita Sanoma lost her two-month-old baby to suspected coronavirus on May 25. The boy was buried, without her knowledge, 300 kilometers (185 miles) from her village.

The infant died in hospital in Boa Vista, capital of the northwestern state of Roraima.

The burial followed government health guidelines that run counter to Yanomami culture, which dictates that the deceased must be cremated.

The authorities “have to understand and respect the cultural issue,” indigenous leader Mauricio Yekuana told AFP, outraged at the suffering of the young mother and three other women with similar experiences.

As part of the Yanomami’s funerary rites, the remains are displayed

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These Arizona teachers shared a classroom for summer school. All 3 contracted COVID-19. 1 died.

Kids begged to go to Mrs. Byrd’s classroom to do art projects. 

Every year, Mrs. Byrd taught folklórico dance to her first-grade students. 

And though she had once retired, Mrs. Byrd loved teaching so much, she couldn’t help but return to the classroom, her husband, Jesse Byrd, said. 

Now she’s gone. Kimberley Chavez Lopez Byrd died June 26 after testing positive for COVID-19.

She taught first grade in the Hayden-Winkelman Unified School District in a small eastern Arizona community. Before she tested positive, Byrd and two other teachers taught a summer school class virtually from the same classroom. All three teachers came down with the virus.

Byrd, 61, was admitted to a hospital and put on a ventilator for more than a dozen days, her condition slowly deteriorating, before she died. Now, the community is grieving for a teacher her colleagues say was ingrained in the fabric of their school

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Chinese Beauty Industry Experts Defend Whitening Products

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LONDON — Major beauty brands are changing how they describe whitening and lightening skin-care products, but is that what the consumer wants in China, the category’s largest Asian market?

“I will still buy ‘whitening’ or ‘brightening’ products because I prefer looking fairer and I don’t like the way I look when I am tanned. It has nothing to do with me wanting to assimilate to the Western ideal of beauty, wealth and social status, it’s just my personal preference,” said Fiona Liu, a product designer in Shanghai. She is also an amateur beauty vlogger who spends a good amount of her salary on skin-care products.

“Reading about what brands are doing to not seem racist makes me want to roll my eyes. While I sympathize with women in South Asia and Africa, or women from minority backgrounds in Europe and North America using

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Dr. Fauci Says U.S. Isn’t Doing Well In The Coronavirus Fight: ‘We’re Just Not’

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, said Thursday that the country was not doing well as cases of the coronavirus continue to surge nationwide, and he placed some of the blame on a divisive culture that has politicized efforts to fight the pandemic.

Fauci made the comments on FiveThirtyEight’s “Podcast-19” as a surge in cases has spread across many states, some of which are setting daily records for new infections and warning of rapidly filling hospital beds. At the same time, calls for Americans to wear face masks and avoid large crowds have remained highly controversial in some places, setting off heated confrontations even as some leaders have conceded they may have reopened their states too soon.

“You have to be having blindfolders on and covering your ears to think that we don’t live in a very divisive society now, from a political standpoint,” Fauci said. “I

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Pandemic Changes the Face of Pop-Ups

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As retail reopens around the U.S., pop-ups are popping up more than ever.

For the past few years, these temporary retail spaces were all the rage for companies seeking a relatively inexpensive way to test the brick-and-mortar waters. The strategy was so successful with both brands and landlords that pop-ups were pervasive on seemingly every street in urban areas around the country.

Then the pandemic hit and all retail locations were forced to close, including pop-ups. Now that brick-and-mortar sites have begun reopening, the landscape is markedly different. Consumers are still wary of going back to stores as the coronavirus continues to have a profound effect on the way we live our lives. Retailers have had to institute wide-scale changes in how they operate to convince customers that it’s safe for them to return — masks, gloves, Plexiglass shields, constant disinfecting of high-touch

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Search continues for ‘Glee’ star’s body; education lawsuits pile up

Actress Naya Rivera is presumed dead after going missing during a boat trip in Ventura County. The state and the University of California file separate lawsuits against the Trump administration. And a tired California mother envisioned a faster, healthier way to feed her daughter. Think Keurig, for babies. 

It’s Arlene with all the news to know this Thursday.

But first, Downtown Disney reopened Thursday morning to throngs of visitors clamoring for some of that M-I-C-K-E-Y M-O-U-S-E feeling. What coronavirus?

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‘Glee’ star presumed dead following what was to be a short boat trip 

A Ventura County Sheriff's helicopter aids in the search on Thursday, July 9, 2020, for "Glee" actress Naya Rivera, who was missing after renting a boat with her 4-year-old son at Lake Piru on Wednesday.
A Ventura County Sheriff’s helicopter aids in the search on Thursday, July 9, 2020, for “Glee” actress Naya Rivera, who was missing after renting a boat with her 4-year-old son at
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Social distancing won’t stop until there’s a vaccine, B.C. health officials say

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 106,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and more than 8,700 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

July 9

7:15 p.m.: COVID-19 polls of the day

7:00 p.m.: B.C.’s top doctor says some public health measures will

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Fauci says ‘divisiveness’ hurts response; Big Ten schools to only play league games; CDC won’t rewrite school rules

Florida saw an alarming increase in deaths and top federal health officials ran counter to President Donald Trump’s wishes, saying guidelines for reopening schools won’t be rewritten and some states should consider shutting down again as coronavirus cases spike nationwide Thursday.

The Big Ten announced it will limit its fall sports to only conference games, impacting several significant scheduled football games. The ACC pushed the start of its season back to Sept. 1.

Florida reported 120 deaths – almost 50% more than the previous one-day high of 83 in late April – as the state surpassed 4,000 deaths. Nationwide, the Johns Hopkins data dashboard reported a one-day total of 820 U.S. deaths and a near-record 58,601 new cases.

“Any state that is having a serious problem, that state should seriously look at shutting down,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said on “The

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4 questions parents need to ask before sending kids back to school this fall

Though coronavirus cases show no signs of slowing and are actually spiking in states like Florida, Texas and California, President Trump has made it clear schools will reopen for the fall semester in the coming months.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recently made a general recommendation that children physically return to school for the social and emotional benefits and for access to a better learning environment, especially for students with special needs. The AAP also noted that returning to school could help narrow the gap in racial and socioeconomic inequities between students’ households.

With cities and workplaces reopened, working parents worry they could be forced to choose between their jobs and their children if their young children cannot return to school.

But with states like Florida hitting record highs of new COVID-19 cases sometimes daily, both parents and teachers are wondering if sending children back to school in a

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