Day: June 29, 2020

High Risk for Coronavirus | Protect Yourself

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As the COVID-19 pandemic continues unfolding around the globe, people who are at higher risk for severe disease need to take special care.

COVID-19 appears to cause mild to moderate symptoms in most people who are infected. And some people seem to have no apparent effects from the virus.

But the older you are, the greater your risk for hospitalization, admission to an intensive care unit, being placed on a ventilator, and death, according to new guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

For instance, people in their 50s are at higher risk than those in their 40s, and those in their 60s and 70s are at greater risk than those in their 50s, the CDC says. People 85 and older are at the greatest risk. (In the U.S., about 8 in 10 deaths from COVID-19 are

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WHO issues ‘worst is yet to come’ warning; Jacksonville, the host of GOP convention, mandating masks

As coronavirus cases climbed in the U.S. and across the globe, the World Health Organization director general warned “the worst is yet to come.” 

Adjustments were being made to help slow spreading of the disease. The city scheduled to host the GOP convention is mandating masks. It’s not clear how long the order issued by Jacksonville, Florida, will remain in place. The Republican convention is scheduled for Aug. 24-27 at the VyStar Veterans Memorial Arena. Broadway stages will remain dark through 2020.

Also, a drug company’s steep price for remdesivir, a drug that has proved to shorten recovery times for severe COVID-19 patients by about 31%, is drawing criticism.

Some good news? The nation’s leading infectious diseases expert remains “cautiously optimistic” that a vaccine could be widely available by year’s end.

Here are the most significant developments of the day:

  • Worldwide coronavirus cases surpassed 10 million, while more than 502,000

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These are all the best 4th of July sales you can shop right now

The Fourth of July is a fantastic time to score discounts on home items, electronics, apparel and so much more.
The Fourth of July is a fantastic time to score discounts on home items, electronics, apparel and so much more.

— Recommendations are independently chosen by Reviewed’s editors. Purchases you make through our links may earn us a commission.

The Fourth of July is nearly here, folks—so close, in fact, that we can basically hear the burgers sizzling on the grill and the fireworks going off in the distance. No matter what you have planned for Independence Day, you can start celebrating a little early by scoring some huge savings on clothing, appliances, mattresses, electronics and more thanks to plenty of particularly patriotic sales from all your favorite retailers.

Need help finding products? Sign up for our weekly deals newsletter. It’s free and you can unsubscribe any time.

With discounts on fridges and washing machines at Best Buy and deals on patio furniture, grills and décor at Home Depot and

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Domino’s expands delivery options, home buying moves online

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Monday related to the national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

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FOOD SERVICE:

— Domino’s Pizza is now offering carside delivery service, allowing customers to stay in their cars while one of the pizza company’s workers delivers their order to them.

The chain said Monday that customers can choose the new contactless carryout option when placing a prepaid order online. It is available in U.S. stores.

When a customer places a carside delivery order online, they’ll be prompted to add their vehicle color, make and model, which will be used to identify them when they arrive at the store. Customers can also choose where they’d like their order placed — the passenger side, back seat, trunk or the option to decide when they arrive.

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Jacksonville, the host of GOP convention, mandating masks; Broadway closed until 2021;

The city scheduled to host the GOP convention is mandating masks and Broadway stages will remain dark through 2020 amid a national boom in coronavirus cases. However, the nation’s leading infectious diseases expert remains “cautiously optimistic” that a vaccine could be widely available by year’s end.

Also, a drug company’s steep price for remdesivir, a drug that has proved to shorten recovery times for severe COVID-19 patients by about 31%, is drawing criticism.

Jacksonville, Florida, on Monday joined the growing ranks of cities requiring face coverings to help curb spread of the virus. It’s not clear how long the order will remain in place. The Republican convention is scheduled for Aug. 24-27 at the VyStar Veterans Memorial Arena in Jacksonville and President Donald Trump has famously refused to wear a mask in public.

Nashville, Tennessee, is requiring masks as of Monday. San Francisco Mayor London Breed halted its plans for 

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Where to Buy Face Masks That Are Stylish Online

The fashion world is stepping up in a time of need: Countless companies are now making, selling and donating non-medical grade face masks for daily protection from COVID-19.

Demand for cloth face mask options has soared in recent months, in part because the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now recommends wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) masks in public settings to help slow the spread of COVID-19. PPE masks are usually made from breathable a fabric like cotton and differ from a surgical mask and N95 respirators that experts say should be reserved for health care workers who are caring for the sick.

In times of crisis, it’s heartwarming to see companies we love giving back using the tools and skills they know best. Nordstrom, the largest employer of tailors in the country, has trained its alterations teams to make face masks to distribute to health care workers, while designer

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Swimming Center Opens Monday With Reservation Program

GLENVIEW, IL — With the state officially in Phase 4 of its Restore Illinois plan, public pools are opening with COVID-19 safety guidelines in effect. The Flick Outdoor Aquatic Center opens at 10:45 a.m. Monday with three-hour times blocks available to the public.

Each time block will be limited to 100 visitors at a time, according to the Glenview Park District. These reservations will take the place of previously scheduled Water Walking reservations. Water Walking will continue to be available in early morning time blocks. Lap swim time blocks will continue to be offered all day.

“As we work to open public swim as quickly as we can safely do so, please understand this is our first week back, and our time blocks and policies will change and evolve through this process,” a press release from the Glenview Park district reads. “For this week, we recommend you bring your own

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An Online Hub, Social Distancing, and Maybe Even a Date Shift

The 2021 Sundance Film Festival may still be months from unfolding in Park City, Utah, but newly-installed festival director Tabitha Jackson has revealed that the festival is planning for a range of scenarios when it comes to imagining what the event will look like during the global health crisis. In a wide-ranging new memo, the former director of Sundance Institute’s documentary film program (who was announced as John Cooper’s successor just five months ago), addressed the current climate and Sundance’s reaction to it.

Although the memo provides few specific details about the next edition, Jackson outlined plans for national screenings, online access to the lineup, and even hinted at a potential date change.

While other festivals have opted to go entirely virtual or postpone their physical editions altogether, heavy hitters like TIFF are carving out the possibility of mounting an event that offers both physical and virtual components. For now, … Read More

With bankruptcies surging, 2020 may become one of the busiest years for Chapter 11 filings since the Great Recession

Twelve midsize to large corporations – all with more than $10 million in debt – filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection during the third week of June, another consequence of the coronavirus pandemic and continued trouble in America’s oil industry.

The filings represent the highest weekly total of the year, and experts believe this is just the beginning of a bankruptcy tsunami that will wash over the country’s largest companies this summer and then drench both smaller businesses and individuals if government stimulus money dries up.

“I very much expect to see the numbers continue to rise” said Ed Flynn, a consultant for the American Bankruptcy Institute, a nonpartisan research organization. “Every day there are more rumors of this or that company, and the rumors are almost never wrong.”

The types of companies affected are unsurprising. Since the start of the pandemic, they have included businesses that consumers have studiously

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Broadway closed until 2021; high price set for promising drug; Fauci optimistic of vaccine by year’s end

Broadway stages will remain dark through 2020 amid a national boom in coronavirus cases, but the nation’s leading infectious diseases expert remains “cautiously optimistic” that a vaccine could be widely available by year’s end.

And a drug company’s steep price for remdesivir, a drug that has proved to shorten recovery times for severe COVID-19 patients by about 31%, is drawing criticism.

Nashville, Tennessee, is requiring masks as of Monday. San Francisco Mayor London Breed halted its plans for businesses that were scheduled to reopen Monday. In Arizona, the mayor of one town said he has no plans to cancel a slew of upcoming summer events or require masks despite a boom in cases in his state.

“It is somewhat alarming how many expect and almost invite a more drastic infringement on their freedoms,” Eagar Mayor Bryce Hamblin said in a statement. “My response from the onset of COVID-19 pandemic has

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